Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Business
  2. Economics
20 February 2012updated 26 Sep 2015 8:31pm

Chart of the day: nuclear weapons – who has what?

The number of nuclear warheads in Russia, the US and the rest.

By George Eaton

While the “international community” is focused on ensuring Iran doesn’t get its hands on a nuclear weapon, today’s chart of the day looks at just how well-armed some of its members are.

A

Under the terms of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, there are officially only five “nuclear-weapon states” (China, France, Russia, the UK and the US) but four states that were not party to the treaty – India, Israel, Pakistan and North Korea – have since acquired nuclear weapons.

South Africa became the first country to voluntarily give up its nuclear weapons in 1989, followed by the former Soviet republics of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Ukraine, whose warheads were transferred to Russia in 1995-96.

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

Brazil, Argentina, Taiwan and South Korea all gave up secret nuclear weapons programmes.