Who's giving the most to Syria?

The most hawkish countries are the least generous donors

To highlight the $2.726bn shortfall in humanitarian aid to Syria, Oxfam has analysed how generous donors are compared to their GDP to identify which countries are pulling their weight, and who is giving too little.

Kuwait comes out as the most generous of the 28 countries analysed, having given over four times its fair share, followed by Denmark and Luxembourg, who have given over twice their fair share, and then Saudi. The UK hasn’t performed too badly, having given 154% of its fair share, but the US has only given 63% of what it should, given its GDP.

At the very bottom of the list are New Zealand, which has only contributed 1% of its fair share, followed by North Korea (2%) and – and this is where it gets interesting – Qatar and Russia who both only gave 3%.

Qatar’s low level of humanitarian support for Syria stands in stark contrast to its military support for rebel fighters, with the FT estimating in May that it has spent as much as $3bn to support rebel fighters. Qatar has also spent billions supporting Islamist parties in the aftermath of the Arab Spring, giving $8bn to Egypt alone. Its commitment to humanitarian relief is clearly not as strong as its commitment to influencing regional foreign policy in its favour.

Of course it’s not the only one to have adopted this position. France, by far the most hawkish European country when it comes to Syria has only given 47% of its fair share. The US's position also makes Obama's appeals to the public to intervene in Syria on humanitarian grounds sound a little hollow. The $819m shortfall in humanitarian funding is considerably less costly than military intervention, and would be a good first step while the US and Russia fight over the finer details of the latest plan.

And while I'm on the subject of Russia, according to Reuters, 50% of the Syrian government’s arms come from Russia, with Assad known to be currently settling bills for over $1.5bn worth of arms deals. Russia's $17.8m aid bill is nothing compared to the income its receiving from weapon sales.

 

Qatar's financial district. The oil rich state is only giving 3% of its fair share of humanitarian aid to Syria. Photo:Getty

Sophie McBain is a freelance writer based in Cairo. She was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman.

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Shimon Peres dies: President Obama leads tributes to Israel's former president and Nobel Peace Prize winner

World leaders rushed to pay tribute to the former Israeli president and Nobel Peace Prize winner. 

Shimon Peres, the former Israeli prime minister, president and Nobel Prize winner has died aged 93.

Peres, who served as prime minister twice and later became Israel's ninth president, suffered a stroke two weeks ago and has been seriously ill at a hospital near Tel Aviv since. His condition had improved before a sudden deterioration on Tuesday led to his death.

He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1994 for his role negotiating the Oslo Peace Accords a year earlier, which talked of an independent Palestinian state. 

His son Chemi led the tributes to his father — praising his seven decades of public service and describing him as "one of the founding fathers of the state of Israel" who "worked tirelessly" for it.

World leaders rushed to honour his memory with President Obama calling him "the essence of Israel itself".

"Perhaps because he had seen Israel surmount overwhelming odds, Shimon never gave up on the possibility of peace between Israelis, Palestinians and Israel's neighbours," Obama wrote.

Britain’s chief rabbi Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis bid farewell in an emotional statement: "There will be countless tributes to Shimon Peres over the coming days, but I fear that few, if any, will adequately capture the palpable sense of collective grief felt across the world, nor do justice to the memory of a true giant amongst men," he said.

"It is true that Shimon Peres was a great statesman. He was the noblest of soldiers, a born leader, a uniquely talented diplomat, an inspiring speaker and a relentless campaigner."

The former US president Bill Clinton called Peres a "genius with a big heart" and said he would never forget “how happy” Peres was in 1993 when the Oslo Accords were signed on the White House lawn. 

"The Middle East has lost a fervent advocate for peace and reconciliation and for a future where all the children of Abraham build a better tomorrow together," he said.

"And Hillary and I have lost a true and treasured friend.”

Peres’s former political opponent, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, said in his statement: “Along with all the citizens of Israel, the entire Jewish people and many others around the world, I bow my head in memory of our beloved Shimon Peres, who was treasured by the nation.”

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said that "even in the most difficult hours, he remained an optimist about the prospects for reconciliation and peace".

French president Francois Hollande said "Israel has lost one of its most illustrious statesmen, and peace has lost one of its most ardent defenders"

Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull and Indian PM Narendra Modi have also paid tribute.

Among the world leaders expected to attend his funeral in Jerusalem on Friday are President Obama, Prince Charles and Pope Francis.