Gender and consent: trans is not a deception

Conservatives have made their peace with gay marriage, but trans issues remain beyond their grasp.

This month, right-wing Italian MP and Berlusconi groupie Michaela Biancofiore hit the headlines with a ministerial career that was short, even by Italian standards. Appointed on a Friday, critics took instant exception to a junior equalities minister who opposed gay marriage, refused to make physical contact with a lesbian and suggested that “anyone who goes with a trans has serious issues of sexual identity”.

A spirited rearguard action, in which she accused “gays” of “ghettoising themselves”, only confirmed her unsuitability. She was dismissed in time for the Sunday breakfast news.

That, of course, is Italy and nothing like the UK, where a right-of-centre administration is presently preening itself on its recent equalities achievements. On Wednesday morning, the LGB community was, mostly, celebrating the fact that gay marriage – Lords permitting – was now several steps closer to reality. A few diehards, Peter Tatchell amongst them, bemoaned the fact that civil partnership had not been opened up to all. Mostly the mood was positive.

Not so in the trans community, which sat and watched in utter despair as junior equalities minister Helen Grant swatted away amendments designed to sort out problems facing trans individuals in, or seeking to be in, a state-sanctioned married relationship.

Historically, the gender-reassigned trans person has faced three serious obstacles to a happy married life. To begin with, if already married, the holy grail of a gender recognition certificate (GRC) – which adjusts birth certificate to an individual’s actual gender identity – was beyond their reach. Divorce first – and then jump through a series of bureaucratic hurdles to “prove” to a disbelieving state that one really, really is the gender one claims.

That has proven heart-breaking for many. Hold on to a marriage into which you have invested a great deal of love and life: or let go, possibly replacing it with a civil partnership. Except there has always been a second obstacle, which is that “survivor’s benefits” – the bit of pension that a spouse would get if they survived you into old age – would be counted only from the date of the NEW civil partnership. Potentially, that single piece of paper could cost your partner tens of thousands of pounds in pension.

Thankfully, that particular iniquity is gone. You may now continue in your marriage, which will seamlessly translate from opposite to same sex on acquisition of the GRC. Before obtaining your GRC, however, you must show that your partner actively consents to it. Not that they are aware, or have been informed: but that they consent. This is a seriously odd requirement, seeing as how their consent has not previously been required for other changes, including name, hormones, or surgery. Or even a second mortgage on the home!

Its been a while since one partner to a marriage was required to ask their spouse’s permission for significant decisions: decades since women were forced, humiliatingly, to go cap in hand to husband for such permission. Basic equality, it seems, is not for the trans spouse.

Meanwhile, the government has held on to an even stranger anomaly. It's offensive, and, in conjunction with other recent legal developments may yet end up killing someone. No matter!

A marriage is voidable on the grounds that either party did not validly consent to it, “whether in consequence of duress, mistake, unsoundness of mind or otherwise”. That’s fair, and covers most eventualities – including the possibility that one party was trans and had not mentioned that fact to the other.

Should they? In practice, that’s an issue that rarely arises. In a close relationship, gender history, along with fertility, religion and views on having children is discussed, is disclosed. Times, however, are changing. Some men, some women of trans history are now transitioning very early. They assert their gender as young as five or six, will never undergo a puberty reflecting their birth gender: by the time they are “of marriageable age”, they will have spent three-quarters of their life living the gender they understand themselves to be.

Should they really be obliged, by law, to disclose? Particularly when no similar obligation is imposed on those who just happen not to have mentioned a past that includes any number of crimes – from child abuse to rape to murder.

Definitely odd. Doubly odd, that marriage law should contain a special clause identifying just one ground for voiding a marriage, over and above any other possible ground. Can you guess? Yes: its non-disclosure of a GRC. And while that might have made sense in an era when same sex marriage was verboten, once this new legislation passes, it ceases to.

Could this get people killed? Not exactly: but it sits uneasily alongside recent police and CPS decisions to prosecute trans persons for not disclosing birth gender when it comes to having intimate relations. Let’s remind ourselves of the fundamental message here: it is OK not to disclose past criminal status.

Every attempt to force sex offenders and perpetrators of domestic violence to reveal themselves to prospective partners is dogged with squeals from the civil liberties lobby. How could you possibly insist? Do you not trust men?

No comment.

I observe only that an establishment that keeps putting gender history over and above every other issue when it comes to validating intimate consent is sending a message loud and clear: that trans is a form of deception; and deception must be controlled and ultimately punished.

And while junior equalities minister, Helen Grant came nowhere close to the odiousness of Biancofiore in her response to the Commons this week, her failure to understand, her failure to get to grips with current policy suggests a deeper truth: that while Conservatives may have made their peace with the gay community, the world of T remains, for now, a step too far, just a little too “icky” for personal comfort.

A pro-gay marriage demonstration in Trafalgar Square. Photograph: Getty Images

Jane Fae is a feminist writer. She tweets as @JaneFae.

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Qatar is determined to stand up to its Gulf neighbours – but at what price?

The tensions date back to the maverick rule of Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani.

For much of the two decades plus since Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani deposed his father to become emir of Qatar, the tiny gas-rich emirate’s foreign policy has been built around two guiding principles: differentiating itself from its Gulf neighbours, particularly the regional Arab hegemon Saudi Arabia, and insulating itself from Saudi influence. Over the past two months, Hamad’s strategy has been put to the test. From a Qatari perspective it has paid off. But at what cost?

When Hamad became emir in 1995, he instantly ruffled feathers. He walked out of a meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) because, he believed, Saudi Arabia had jumped the queue to take on the council’s rotating presidency. Hamad also spurned the offer of mediation from the then-President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan al-Nahyan. This further angered his neighbours, who began making public overtures towards Khalifa, the deposed emir, who was soon in Abu Dhabi and promising a swift return to power in Doha. In 1996, Hamad accused Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the UAE of sponsoring a coup attempt against Hamad, bringing GCC relations to a then-all-time low.

Read more: How to end the stand off in the Gulf

The spat was ultimately resolved, as were a series of border and territory disputes between Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia, but mistrust of Hamad - and vice versa - has lingered ever since. As crown prince, Hamad and his key ally Hamad bin Jassim al-Thani had pushed for Qatar to throw off what they saw as the yoke of Saudi dominance in the Gulf, in part by developing the country’s huge gas reserves and exporting liquefied gas on ships, rather than through pipelines that ran through neighbouring states. Doing so freed Qatar from the influence of the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries, the Saudi-dominated oil cartel which sets oil output levels and tries to set oil market prices, but does not have a say on gas production. It also helped the country avoid entering into a mooted GCC-wide gas network that would have seen its neighbours control transport links or dictate the – likely low - price for its main natural resource.

Qatar has since become the richest per-capita country in the world. Hamad invested the windfall in soft power, building the Al Jazeera media network and spending freely in developing and conflict-afflicted countries. By developing its gas resources in joint venture with Western firms including the US’s Exxon Mobil and France’s Total, it has created important relationships with senior officials in those countries. Its decision to house a major US military base – the Al Udeid facility is the largest American base in the Middle East, and is crucial to US military efforts in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan – Qatar has made itself an important partner to a major Western power. Turkey, a regional ally, has also built a military base in Qatar.

Hamad and Hamad bin Jassem also worked to place themselves as mediators in a range of conflicts in Sudan, Somalia and Yemen and beyond, and as a base for exiled dissidents. They sold Qatar as a promoter of dialogue and tolerance, although there is an open question as to whether this attitude extends to Qatar itself. The country, much like its neighbours, is still an absolute monarchy in which there is little in the way of real free speech or space for dissent. Qatar’s critics, meanwhile, argue that its claims to promote human rights and free speech really boil down to an attempt to empower the Muslim Brotherhood. Doha funded Muslim Brotherhood-linked groups during and after the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011, while Al Jazeera cheerleaded protest movements, much to the chagrin of Qatar's neighbours. They see the group as a powerful threat to their dynastic rule and argue that the Brotherhood is a “gateway drug” to jihadism. In 2013,  after Western allies became concerned that Qatar had inadvertently funded jihadist groups in Libya and Syria, Hamad was forced to step down in favour of his son Tamim. Soon, Tamim came under pressure from Qatar’s neighbours to rein in his father’s maverick policies.

Today, Qatar has a high degree of economic independence from its neighbours and powerful friends abroad. Officials in Doha reckon that this should be enough to stave off the advances of the “Quad” of countries – Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE - that have been trying to isolate the emirate since June. They have been doing this by cutting off diplomatic and trade ties, and labelling Qatar a state sponsor of terror groups. For the Quad, the aim is to end what it sees as Qatar’s disruptive presence in the region. For officials in Doha, it is an attempt to impinge on the country’s sovereignty and turn Qatar into a vassal state. So far, the strategies put in place by Hamad to insure Qatar from regional pressure have paid off. But how long can this last?

Qatar’s Western allies are also Saudi Arabia and the UAE’s. Thus far, they have been paralysed by indecision over the standoff, and after failed mediation attempts have decided to leave the task of resolving what they see as a “family affair” to the Emir of Kuwait, Sabah al-Sabah. As long as the Quad limits itself to economic and diplomatic attacks, they are unlikely to pick a side. It is by no means clear they would side with Doha in a pinch (President Trump, in defiance of the US foreign policy establishment, has made his feelings clear on the issue). Although accusations that Qatar sponsors extremists are no more true than similar charges made against Saudi Arabia or Kuwait – sympathetic local populations and lax banking regulations tend to be the major issue – few Western politicians want to be seen backing an ally, that in turn many diplomats see as backing multiple horses.

Meanwhile, although Qatar is a rich country, the standoff is hurting its economy. Reuters reports that there are concerns that the country’s massive $300bn in foreign assets might not be as liquid as many assume. This means that although it has plenty of money abroad, it could face a cash crunch if the crisis rolls on.

Qatar might not like its neighbours, but it can’t simply cut itself off from the Gulf and float on to a new location. At some point, there will need to be a resolution. But with the Quad seemingly happy with the current status quo, and Hamad’s insurance policies paying off, a solution looks some way off.