Comedy in locomotion: Marilyn Monroe in Some Like it Hot (1959)
Sax and spats: The Culture Studio reviews Some Like it Hot
By Antonia Quirke - 05 August 10:19

There’s such pleasure for the listener in hearing something you know being chewed over properly.

Beast of Eden: Dore Strauch and Friedrich Ritter set up camp in the Galapagos Islands in 1929
Death in paradise: Ryan Gilbey on The Galapagos Affair
By Ryan Gilbey - 28 July 16:13

Drawing largely on home movies shot by the subjects in the 1930s, the picture pieces together the circumstances that led to several unexplained deaths. 

Snowpiercer.
It's some kind of miracle that Snowpiercer was ever released - and it was worth the wait
By Ryan Gilbey - 25 July 12:34

Despite its occasional longeurs and lapses of logic, post-global-freeze thriller Snowpiercer is an intoxicating mishmash of stunts and ideas which deserves to be seen in UK cinemas.

The 50 Shades film trailer shows us Grey's decor is almost as bad as his BDSM rope-work
By Zoe Margolis - 24 July 17:58

Not only does the film look like a bunch of sexist tropes strung out in a row, but if Christian Grey's knots are anything to go by he's rubbish at kink as well.

Award winning director Sofia Coppola at the Cannes Film Festival, May 14, 2014. Photo: Antonin Thuillier, Getty Images
The unspoken glass ceiling of the film industry
By Beth Lambert - 24 July 12:57

A new report uncovers the gender imbalance in the film industry, made worse by the issue of class.

Why publishers should embrace the film world's enthusiasm for releasing a director's cut
By Andrew Ladd - 18 July 12:56

The film world is keen on releasing a director's cut, which differs from the final version of the movie; publishers should do the same with books.

Andy Serkis as the ape-leader Ceasar.
Monkey business: Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is smart, ravishing and bleak
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 July 12:50

The latest addition to the Planet of the Apes franchise is the toughest yet - the transition from playful ape and human interaction to bloody horror comes across as scarily plausible.

Steven Soderberg.
Steven Soderbergh's strange retirement: off-Broadway, brandy and television
By Ryan Gilbey - 16 July 17:58

“Nobody’s talking about movies the way they’re talking about their favourite TV shows,” says veteran director Steven Soderbergh, whose retirement, which isn’t really a retirement, has been stirring up controvesy this week.

The Rutles.
A selection of the best Python projects outside of Monty Python
By Ryan Gilbey - 14 July 13:01

Ryan Gilbey celebrates the best work by individual Pythons outside of their famous collaborations, from John Cleese’s slick Brit-flick A Fish Called Wanda to Eric Idle’s Beatles pastiche The Rutles.

Mason (Ellar Coltrane) and his father (Ethan Hawke) in Linklater’s family drama.
In Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, time fades away
By Ryan Gilbey - 10 July 16:29

Made over more than a decade, this is a film that reminds us life is seen by children from a different angle.

Goltzius and the Pelican Company.
The play’s the thing: Peter Greenaway’s Goltzius and the Pelican Company
By Ryan Gilbey - 08 July 13:00

Critics and audiences may have long given up on British painter-turned-director Peter Greenaway, but his sensuous, smart, arty films are asking questions few others would dare to contemplate.

Dystopian future: a still from Bladerunner (1982)
The Bladerunner book: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep on Radio 4
By Antonia Quirke - 04 July 16:00

Jonathan Holloway’s adaptation rightly cherished many things that the film ultimately minimised, in particular the novel’s mourning of the extinction of various animal species.

Darth Vader.
Jon Spira's Elstree 1976: memorialising the unseen performers in the first Star Wars
By Ryan Gilbey - 03 July 13:06

Jon Spira's forthcoming documentary Elstree 1976 focuses on the Star Wars cast members time forgot: from voice-artists to extras and wookiees.

The Golden Dream.
The Golden Dream by Diego Quemada-Díez: Freedom pass
By Ryan Gilbey - 26 June 15:30

Four young teenagers face violence and desperation on the road to California in this modern road movie with clear echoes of John Ford’s The Grapes of Wrath and Michael Winterbottom’s In This World.

Mrs Brown's Boys.
Why wasn’t “Mrs Brown’s Boys D’Movie” shown to critics ahead of its release?
By Ryan Gilbey - 26 June 12:34

The trend for distributors to refuse advanced previews for critics speaks volumes about their attitude to the press - but it’s a risky strategy, and doesn’t always mean the film is a dud.

Poet and provocateur: Pasolini on location in Italy, 1970s. Photo: Mondadori via Getty
St Paul, Caravaggio and the agonised Catholicism of Pasolini
By Ian Thomson - 26 June 10:00

San Paolo, published posthumously in 1977 and presented here for the first time in English as St Paul, is Pasolini’s screenplay for the life of the apostle. 

Cinema Paradiso is perhaps the ultimate cinema-nostalgia film.
At the movies: the cultural history of cinemas on the big screen
By Oliver Farry - 25 June 12:48

Films that feature actual cinemas in them often combine them with a sense of nostalgia for lost youth, for the picture houses of a bygone era.

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in "22 Jump Street".
22 Jump Street isn’t just homofriendly – it’s homolovely
By Ryan Gilbey - 19 June 13:21

Time and again this smart sequel turns down the opportunity to make homosexuality the butt of the joke. Instead, it provides a welcome mainstream attack on homophobia.

Odd couple: Shailene Woodley as Hazel and Ansel Elgort as Augustus in The Fault in Our Stars. Photo: 20th Century Fox
Love in a time of cancer: The Fault in Our Stars
By Ryan Gilbey - 19 June 12:43

An unconventional romance between two young cancer patients is not as hard-hitting as it could be. 

Stir crazy: a quiet moment for Piper Chapman (Taylor Schilling)
The America you don’t see: Orange is the New Black on Netflix
By Rachel Cooke - 12 June 16:00

Here are lesbians, bisexuals, fat people, tattooed people, old people, disturbed people, constipated people, people without teeth and of course crooked people.

Family values: Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Dido and Sarah Gadon as Lady Elizabeth Murray in Belle
Race and sensibility: Belle by Amma Asante
By Ryan Gilbey - 12 June 16:00

As the illegitimate mixed-race daughter of an admiral in 18th-century England, Dido Elizabeth Bell’s status is too high to allow her to eat with the servants, yet too low to permit her to join guests for dinner.

Poland's Kamil Majchrzak serves against US player Noah Rubin at Wimbledon 2014. Photo: Getty
Ballet on Centre Court: how modern tennis fuses strength and grace
By Ed Smith - 12 June 10:00

Tennis has not become ugly. It has got more beautiful. Professionalisation did not ruin its balletic strand; it deepened it. The ultimate athletes turned out to be lighter, leaner and more mobile.

The 1982 Brazil World Cup side in action against Argentina. Photo: Getty
Why football loves beautiful losers
By Oliver Farry - 11 June 14:19

Sport’s love affair with the myth of thwarted victory.

Fruitvale Station.
Ryan Coogler's Fruitvale Station: A hagiography shot on shaky cam
By Ryan Gilbey - 06 June 12:00

Fruitvale Station imagines the last day of Oscar Grant's life - a young black American shot dead by a police officer in 2009. The film may be rooted in truth, but it's a long way from documentary.

Ken Loach.
Ken Loach has got us bang to rights: film critics know nothing about real life
By Ryan Gilbey - 04 June 17:39

The esteemed director joins Kevin Smith and William Nicholson among the ranks of writers and directors who blame critics, and their lack of experience, for disliking their films.

Lieutenant Elle Helmer at the Vietnam War Memorial. Image: still from The Invisible War, a Cinedigm/Docurama Films release
The Invisible War: rape is not an “occupational hazard” of serving in the military
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 30 May 9:04

Kirby Dick’s Oscar-nominated documentary reveals the extent to which rape in the military is ignored and covered up.

Last dance: Barry Ward and Simone Kirby in Jimmy's Hall by Ken Loach
Emotional blackmail on the Emerald Isle: Jimmy’s Hall by Ken Loach
By Ryan Gilbey - 29 May 17:02

Jimmy’s Hall returns Loach to early-20th-century Ireland, the site of a previous success. The new film could be called The Wind That Shakes the Barley IIThis Time It’s Heart-Warming.

Give me Samoa: goalkeeper Nicky Salapu in Next Goal Wins
Next Goal Wins: for once, a football film people might actually watch
By Mark Lawson - 29 May 15:51

And celebrating the unlikely kinship of Alan Bennett and Philip Roth. 

Fading Gigolo: A little John Turturro goes a long way. Too much is plain revolting
By Ryan Gilbey - 23 May 11:45

John Turturro's fifth film as director is remarkable for getting so much wrong. The characters are vacuous, it misfires comically, but worst of all is his choice of leading man.

American Samoa footballers Nicky Salapu and Jaiyah Saelua with their coach Thomas Rongen. Photo: Getty
Next Goal Wins: a football film with a vital message about overcoming transphobia in sport
By Eleanor Margolis - 20 May 10:15

A new documentary about the American Samoa football team (who hold the world record for the biggest international defeat – 31-0 to Australia in 2001) gives hope that professional sport won’t always be prejudiced against those who are different.

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