Show Hide image

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

1. Only deluded Tories think the crisis is over (Times)

The increase in real earnings is welcome but millions of Britons are still deeply in the red, writes Jenni Russell. 

2. As the bombs fall, the people of Damascus rally round Assad (Daily Telegraph)

The west may oppose Assad's regime, but on the streets of the capital the people fear a greater evil, writes Peter Oborne. 

3. Putin has more admirers than the west might think (Guardian)

Russia has found out who its friends are recently – and thanks to some old resentments, that includes India and China, writes Timothy Garton Ash. 

4. The Church needs more than this hapless Rev (Times)

The hero of the BBC’s religious sitcom is likeable but ineffectual, says Tim Montgomerie. Christians have to fight harder for their faith.

5. Ed Miliband will fail if he gives in to the sirens of austerity (Guardian)

Hollande's rout in the French local elections shows the price to be paid if Labour embraces cuts and corporate power, says Seumas Milne. 

6. Farage and Salmond want you to live in Outopia (Times)

The Ukip and SNP leaders come from different political traditions but they share more than they’ll ever admit, writes David Aaronovitch. 

7. Britain’s loudmouth literary crowd (Financial Times)

A few blunt words are unlikely to hurt Sajid Javid, who spent years at the sharp end in the City, writes Janan Ganesh. 

8. It’s two decades since ‘education, education, education’, but still Britain’s primary school admissions are a farce (Independent)

Choice? There is absolutely zero when it comes to getting your child into a school, writes Jane Merrick. 

9. The bear has made monkeys of the west (Financial Times)

There is no reason to fear a strong and self-confident Russia, says Bruce Anderson.

10. Scottish referendum: the UK is on shifting sands – we can't assume survival (Guardian)

A yes vote is becoming a real possibility – but we are woefully unprepared to deal with the psychological impact of Scotland rejecting the union, writes Martin Kettle. 

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.