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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Russia is a hostile power, but this is not a new cold war (Guardian)

The west needs to step back from the Ukraine crisis and devise a new strategy of containment towards Vladimir Putin, says Martin Kettle. 

2. Man Utd and Britain share a problem – debt (Times)

The football club is paying off its borrowings, writes Tim Montgomerie. But for Labour, the deficit will force tough decisions on tax and spending.

3. Boris, George and selfish scheming that could hand Labour the keys to Downing Street (Daily Mail)

The Mayor and the Chancellor should leave their machinations until after the election, says Stephen Glover. 

4. This war on 'Islamism' only fuels hatred and violence (Guardian)

Tony Blair's anti-democratic tirade chimes with David Cameron's toxic manoeuvring at home and in the Muslim world, says Seumas Milne. 

5. The mysteries of the UK economy unravel (Financial Times)

Three almost universally held ‘truths’ will wither when new standards are adopted, writes Chris Giles. 

6. Rebellion is brewing against the elite that has ruined Europe (Daily Telegraph)

"The idiot in Brussels" and his like may keep their jobs for now, but trust is evaporating fast, says Peter Oborne.

7. Enjoy the sushi and hot noodles while you can, Barack – the Chinese will remain cold (Independent)

For two of the countries on his itinerary, the timing is especially poor, says David Usborne. 

8. London borough elections: Britain's other other country (Guardian)

London elected 14 more MPs than Scotland in 2010 – this other country is under parliament's nose, notes a Guardian editorial. 

9. Kim turns into the Macbeth of North Korea (Times)

Planning is already in place in case the leader’s brutality leads to his assassination and the collapse of the regime, writes Michael Burleigh. 

10. Latin rebels turn to pragmatism (Financial Times)

But take Venezuelan and Argentine reform with pinch of salt, says an FT editorial.