Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. US Republicans make the poor pay to balance the budget (Guardian)

The impetus to cut food stamps is ideological not fiscal, and low-wages mean work provides no guarantee against hunger, writes Gary Younge. 

2. Worry about the euro, not the EU (Financial Times)

The union is not compatible with a single currency in the long run, warns Wolfgang Münchau.

3. Start spreading the news, New York’s going left (Times)

After two decades of prosperity and falling crime, the Big Apple will end the Giuliani era, writes Justin Webb.

4. Europe is an anchor for British business (Guardian)

Fantasists on the right argue that in this globalised world we should cut free from the EU, writes Vince Cable. The opposite is true, the CBI says.

5. As Morsi goes to trial, General Sisi should remember: Egypt is a dangerous place to rule (Independent)

The erstwhile President appears in court at a tense time even by Egypt's standards, writes Robert Fisk.

6. China built its HS2 in two years. Don’t let Labour derail ours (Daily Telegraph)

Balls and co thought it was a great idea, writes Boris Johnson. Until they spotted a chance to woo the sceptic vote.

7. Outside the Westminster bubble George Osborne's economic recovery election strategy is just another Con (Daily Mirror)

Much of London outside Mayfair and the City isn’t feeling richer, little or none of the growth is reaching them, writes Kevin Maguire.

8. Listen up, Britain! The people who get everything wrong say we can't leave the EU (Daily Mail)

Little more than a decade ago, the CBI insisted we had ‘no alternative’ but to abandon the pound and join the euro, writes Dominic Lawson. 

9. What's all the fuss about the royal charter meaning the end of press freedom? (Guardian)

The royal charter doesn't establish any regulation of the press – but the fourth estate still needs urgently to re-establish credibility, says Chris Huhne.

10. Snowden has done us all a favour (Financial Times)

For a whole generation, the US is coming to stand for Big Brother, writes Edward Luce.

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The New Statesman Cover: The revenge of the left

A first look at this week's magazine.

22 - 28 September issue
The revenge of the left