Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What does Mr Cameron believe in? His own ministers aren't sure (Observer)

The Tory leader's lack of deep convictions has been good for coalition relations, but bad for dealing with his party, says Andrew Rawnsley.

2. Of course a privileged background matters, and it's not the politics of envy to say so (Sunday Telegraph)

Tories addressing social mobility must accept the scale of the problem, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

3. The big freeze is here, so George cosies up to voters (Mail on Sunday)

Osborne knows that his challenge is to show that the proceeds of growth will be shared, writes James Forsyth.

4. It’s getting better; the Tories just can’t convince us (Sunday Times)

Major, Miliband, Milburn — not one of them is making it any easier for the prime minister to frame the argument his way, writes Adam Boulton.

5. Interest rates rules have been turned upside (Independent on Sunday)

A rise is expected next year, making savers happy and plunging the heavily mortgaged into despair, writes Hamish McRae.

6. The one place we don’t need a visionary leader: on the throne (Sunday Times)

There was another King Charles who believed that his divine right trumped all other opinions, writes Dominic Lawson. It did not end well.

7. George Osborne, call yourself a Tory when you fritter taxes? (Observer)

The chancellor's reckless use of taxpayers' money to boost borrowing on housing is anti-Conservative and will end in disaster, says Nick Cohen.

8. No more evasion and prevarication – Britain's elite must be held to account (Observer)

The blocking of the Chilcot report underlines how the powerful shield their activities from the public, says Henry Porter.

9. Maoist class war wrecked our state schools (Sunday Telegraph)

For too long teachers have thought it wrong to transmit 'posh' standards of literate speech, says Janet Daley.

10. Typhoon Haiyan shows the heat is on for our climate - but Britain has lost its leading role (Sunday Mirror)

Energy Secretary Ed Davey is trying to do the right thing but is opposed by Tories who’d rather listen to Top Gear than top scientists, says John Prescott.