The New Statesman is looking for a Culture Editor

Applications are open.

 

The NS is looking for a new culture editor to start at the end of May. The successful candidate for this job will need:

  • Excellent knowledge of culture, literature and the arts to commission the best writers and identify the most interesting upcoming releases     
  • The organisational ability to plan well ahead
  • Superb, careful close editing skills to ensure fine writing is encouraged and refined
  • The ability to work collaboratively with our small, dedicated team
  • Plenty of ideas for coverage across both the books and main features pages of the magazine and online.

Our ideal culture editor is a brilliant generalist, somebody who is as at home writing a leader on politics as they are interviewing Charlotte Church. The New Statesman has always been proud of the depth and range of its books and arts pages and we are looking for somebody with energy and imagination and who loves high and popular culture and can cover both in an intelligent way.

Because the New Statesman team is small, you will be expected to contribute ideas across the magazine and help us develop our special editions. There will also be the opportunity to host cultural events and contribute to our podcast and website.

The personality of the culture editor defines the culture pages of the magazine, so please include with your CV and covering letter a short appraisal (up to 500 words) of the NS’s culture and books coverage and what you would do differently. And tell us which writers you would introduce to the NS.

Applications by noon on Friday 10 May to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis (Helen@newstatesman.co.uk) with the subject line “NS Culture Editor”. 

 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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RMT poised to rejoin the Labour Party

The transport union is set to vote on reaffiliation to the party, with RMT leaders backing the move.

Plans are being drawn up for the RMT (the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) to reaffiliate to the Labour Party in the wake of Jeremy Corbyn’s significant gains in the general election, the New Statesman has learnt.

The union, which represents tube drivers and other workers across the transport sector, was expelled from the Labour Party under Tony Blair after some Scottish branches voted to support the Scottish Socialist Party instead.

But the RMT endorsed both of Corbyn’s bids for the Labour leadership and its ruling national executive committee backed a Labour vote on 8 June.

Corbyn addressed the RMT’s annual general meeting in Exeter yesterday, where he was “given a hero’s welcome”, in the words of one delegate. Mick Cash, the RMT’s general secretary, praised Corbyn as the union’s “long-term friend and comrade”.

After the meeting, Steve Hedley, assistant general secretary at the RMT, posted a picture to Facebook with John McDonnell. The caption read: “With the shadow chancellor John McDonnell arguing that we should affiliate to the Labour Party after consulting fully and democratically with our members”.

The return of the RMT to Labour would be welcomed by the party leadership with open arms. And although its comparably small size would mean that the RMT would have little effect on the internal workings of Labour Party conference or its ruling NEC, its wide spread across the country could make the union a power player in the life of local Labour parties.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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