Watch: Eddie Mair roasts Boris

Mair deflects the London Mayor's multiple attempts to change tack.

Boris Johnson had a diffcult time in an interview with Eddie Mair this morning, in which he was called "a nasty piece of work", and during which his multiple attempts to change course were defeated by Mair, who insisted the interview was about Johnson's integrity. Watch the clip below:

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The interview started with Mair asking about the upcoming documentary "Boris Johnson: The Irresistable Rise". Boris said he "hadn't seen it", to which Mair replied "but this happened in your life so you know about this."

Mair then asked Johnson about his dismissal from the Times over making up a quote. Boris asked whether Mair was sure "our viewers wouldn't want to hear more about housing", but Mair disagreed. Boris admitted he had "mildly sandpapered" a quote while at the Times, to which Mair responded "let me ask you about a bare faced lie."

Boris was quizzed about the time he was sacked for lying to his party about an affair, and the infamous recorded phone call with Darius Guppy. Boris said he "disputed" the interpretations of events.

Photograph: Getty Images

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.