Watch: Eddie Mair roasts Boris

Mair deflects the London Mayor's multiple attempts to change tack.

Boris Johnson had a diffcult time in an interview with Eddie Mair this morning, in which he was called "a nasty piece of work", and during which his multiple attempts to change course were defeated by Mair, who insisted the interview was about Johnson's integrity. Watch the clip below:

Get Adobe Flash player

The interview started with Mair asking about the upcoming documentary "Boris Johnson: The Irresistable Rise". Boris said he "hadn't seen it", to which Mair replied "but this happened in your life so you know about this."

Mair then asked Johnson about his dismissal from the Times over making up a quote. Boris asked whether Mair was sure "our viewers wouldn't want to hear more about housing", but Mair disagreed. Boris admitted he had "mildly sandpapered" a quote while at the Times, to which Mair responded "let me ask you about a bare faced lie."

Boris was quizzed about the time he was sacked for lying to his party about an affair, and the infamous recorded phone call with Darius Guppy. Boris said he "disputed" the interpretations of events.

Photograph: Getty Images

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.