Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband is a man with the makings of a brave and visionary leader (Guardian)

Bagging mansion tax and the 10p rate for Labour was good politics, but the scale of his economic ambition was better still, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Slavery, not horse meat, is the real scandal (Daily Telegraph)

Long business supply chains are corruptible and can hide a multitude of crimes, says Fraser Nelson.

3. A dark morning in Pretoria has shattered the faith of a nation (Independent)

This Paralympic champion was a hero when South Africa needed one, a sex symbol and celebrity at the same time, but now a different Oscar is beginning to emerge, writes Ivan Fallon.

4. Not such a distinctive Labour vision, after all (Independent)

Ed Miliband's "working people"  sound very much like the Tories' "strivers", notes an Independent editorial.

5. Leave London and you'll find fantasy island (Times) (£)

Labour’s vision of a banker-free economy already exists, writes Philip Collins. It’s in the regions, it’s poorer and it’s not the future.

6. On the teaching of history, Michael Gove is right (Guardian)

Why do critics feel obliged to defend a status quo that so many teachers, parents and pupils agree is indefensible, asks Niall Ferguson. 

7. Transatlantic pact promises bigger prize (Financial Times)

The real reward of a US-EU free trade area would be geopolitical, writes Philip Stephens.

8. A new press regulator (Daily Telegraph)

The Conservatives' ideas for control of the press offer the least worst option, says a Telegraph editorial.

9. Iran’s intransigence (Financial Times)

There is time for a nuclear deal – but Tehran must budge, says an FT editorial.  

10. Why should Harold have to pipe down? (Daily Mail)

For the Labour prime minister's pipe to be downplayed in last night's BBC special on his life is more than just an over-reach of delicate sensibilities, writes Martin Samuel.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.