Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Leveson inquiry is irrelevant to 21st-century journalism (Guardian)

The judge's findings will address the nefarious behaviour of newspapers but not the vast array of media on the internet, writes Emily Bell.

2. Cameron will pay a heavy price for his whips' feebleness (Daily Telegraph)

The PM’s haughty disregard of his own party is reminiscent of Tony Blair at his peak, says Peter Oborne.

3. The law, Fleet Street and a free press (Financial Times)

There are many traps but a decent outcome is possible, writes John Gapper.

4. No time to equivocate on Palestine (Independent)

The UN must approve the Palestinians' bid for recognition as a non-member observer state, says an Independent leader.

5. Work Programme: why I knew the figures would be awful (Guardian)

The idea that the way out of unemployment is via huge contracts for profit-driven enterprises invites them to game the system, says Zoe Williams.

6. You can trust the public. They’re not savages (Times) (£)

People can judge the press for themselves, they can judge TV debates and they can judge how to spend their money, says David Aaronovitch.

7. There is a middle way: a privacy law with a public interest built into it (Independent)

The dichotomy between self-regulation on the one hand and government regulation on the other is false, argues Andreas Whittam Smith.

8. A nanny state that dictates what we drink will soon be telling us how to think (Daily Mail)

People do not elect governments to tell them how to live their lives, or to lecture them about ethical living, writes Simon Heffer.

9. Time for the chancellor to be honest (Financial Times)

The autumn statement must be truthful about the UK’s economic struggle ahead, says Chris Giles.

10. Boles offers a recipe for senseless sprawl (Daily Telegraph)

Unfettered building in the south east would be disastrous, says a Telegraph editorial.

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Telegraph fires environmental journalist Geoffrey Lean

Some have suggested the move is due to the newspapers' scepticism about man-made climate change. 

Geoffrey Lean, the respected enviromental commentator and reporter, has been "pushed out" of the Telegraph, according to the writer. Lean, who pioneered the role of environmental correspondent almost forty years, joined the Telegraph in 2009 after 16 years at the Independent. "Telegraph is pushing me out," Lean tweeted a few days ago. The Telegraph's International Business Editor, Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, tweeted "Departure of climate veteran @GeoffreyLean v sad for Telegraph colleagues. Conservative newspaper has lost a tireless voice for conservation". 

The loss of the respected Lean, some believe, is due to his longstanding support for the idea that climate change is manmade. 

I'm a mole, innit.