Chris Patten: BBC has more senior managers than the communist party

The chairman of the BBC Trust added that Rupert Murdoch's newspapers "were bound to question" his position, but the crisis could be solved by better management.

Chris Patten, the chairman of the BBC Trust, today told Andrew Marr that the BBC was facing its worst crisis since the Hutton Inquiry.

He said that "awful" journalism  had "disgraced" Newsnight, and therefore he understood why the director-general, George Entwistle, had resigned.

Marr asked him whether Entwistle's "car-crash interview" with John Humphreys on Radio 4's Today programme had contributed to his decision to leave. "You don't go on an interview with John Humphreys and expect the bowling to be slow full tosses," Patten replied.

"We're a news organisation and our credibility depends on telling the truth," he added.

Marr asked whether Entwistle's "lack of curiosity" about the incorrect Newsnight story was the problem. Patten agreed partially, adding "from the beginning… he was implicated in the crisis. He was director of vision when that first Newsnight programme went out".

However, he said, Entwistle was "cerebral, decent, honest, brave".

Asked about his own position, Patten said that it was "bound to be under question by Rupert Murdoch's newspapers, let's be clear about that". 

But he later added that opponents of the BBC "are fairly cagey about the way they talk about it" because of the corporation's wide public support. "It is one of the things which defines Britishness." 

As for the suggestion that Newsnight was "toast" - as presenter Eddie Mair suggested on Friday's programme - Patten said: "That's a rather quick judgment … at the heart of our journalism is good investigative, uncompromising journalism, and Newsnight been part of that tradition. We want to hold on to that. We want to make sure that Newsnight and other programmes are properly managed.

"It's obviously been compromised by the fact that senior executives were recused from involvement . . . [but] decisions about the programme went up through every damned layer [of management]".

After Andrew Marr complained about the existence of an out-of-touch "senior management group" at the corporation, Patten said that he had always joked there were "more senior leaders at the BBC than in the Chinese communist party" but that it had worked to change itself.

The BBC Trust chairman promised to appoint a replacement for Entwistle within weeks, and not to let the corporation become too risk-averse. 

Chris Patten on Andrew Marr's programme.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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