Andrew Mitchell resigns as Chief Whip

The fallout from "Plebgate" claims Mitchell, four weeks on, as he admits telling Downing Street police "I thought you guys were supposed to f***ing help us".

The news has just broken that Andrew Mitchell has resigned as Chief Whip.

Number 10 announced on Twitter that David Cameron had accepted the resignation.

Below is Mitchell's resignation letter in which he admits that he swore at the police, but denies calling them "plebs".

In his response to Mitchell, David Cameron said:

Thank you for your letter. I was sorry to receive it, but I understand why you have reached the conclusion you have, and why you have decided to resign from the Government.

I regret that this has become necessary, and am very grateful for all you have done, both in Government and in Opposition – as well as for the kind words in your letter.

As we discussed in advance of the reshuffle, I wanted you to bring your organisational skill and energy to the important job of chief whip. It was clear to me that you had already made a strong start.

As you have acknowledged, the incident in Downing Street was no acceptable and you were right to apologise for it.

You have much to be proud of from your service on the frontbench both in opposition and in government, and in your continued service to your constituents in Sutton Coldfield. I hope that, in time, you will be able to make a further contribution to public life.

Andrew Mitchell. Photo: Getty
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.