A cutaway view of Saturn's moon Enceladus, showing possible hydrothermal activity that may be taking place on and under the seafloor of its subsurface ocean. Image: NASA/JPL
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The unexpectedly watery moons of our Solar System may be friendlier to life than we thought

Secret oceans on the moons Enceladus and Ganymede were discovered within days of each other, reshaping our belief that the Earth is the Solar System's most watery, life-friendly habitat.

Jupiter’s moon Ganymede is named after the cup-bearer of the Greek gods; Saturn's sixth-largest moon, Enceladus, is named after a giant. Both names seem extra fitting in the light of recent, and surprisingly big, news about water.

In the (best-ever) anime series Cowboy Bebop, Ganymede is depicted as an aquatic, terraformed world entirely covered in water - and this may well be more accurate than we first thought, as Nasa’s Hubble Space Telescope has confirmed the existence of subsurface water on the huge moon by watching how its aurora lights slither around its edges. Astronomers believe this ocean, hidden underneath around 153km of crusty ice, is ten times deeper than those of Earth.

This new discovery has hoisted Ganymede up the list of the top contenders for places in our Solar System which could potentially harbour life. It also has relatively good timing - the European Space Agency (ESA) is currently working on mission plans ahead of the launch of the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (or Juice for short) in 2022, with the aim of getting a closer inspection of Jupiter’s moons Ganymede, Callisto and Europa through the 2030s.

Speculation about Ganymede’s secret ocean is not a new one, as scientists have suspected its existence since the 1970s, despite inconclusive evidence. What sets Ganymede apart from any other moon (aside from its size - it's larger than Mercury) is its self-generating magnetic field, which, just like Earth, is caused by its liquid, iron-rich core. This makes the detection of a copious amount of subsurface liquid water easier - more so than any other icy moon in our Solar System - because a magnetic field causes auroras, brightly-coloured ribbons of hot, electrified gas in the atmospheric regions circulating north and south poles. Ganymede is also close enough to Jupiter that their magnetic fields are interlaced, enhancing the aurora even more than usual. When Jupiter’s magnetic field changes, so does Ganymede’s, "rocking" back and forth over about a five hour period.

The auroras of Ganymede give away the existence of a subsurface saltwater ocean because saltwater can generate its own magnetic field when sloshing around, and can also therefore weaken the effects of Jupiter's. Joachim Saur and his colleagues of the University of Cologne in Germany came up with the idea of applying the motions of the two auroras to determine the amount (if any) of saltwater underneath Ganymede’s crust using the Hubble Space Telescope. He told the NS that the data showed that Ganymede had low auroral oscillations compared to models without an ocean - or, in other words, that Ganymede does have a saltwater ocean underneath its crust.

Nasa’s Galileo mission measured Ganymede’s magnetic field in 2002 but couldn’t see the full extent of its magnetic variation as its fly-bys of Ganymede lasted just 20 minutes - far too brief to measure the magnetic field of this subsurface saltwater ocean. Saur’s team instead watched Ganymede using the Hubble Space Telescope for seven hours. The data suggests that the global ocean is between 150 and 250km deep, and this broad range of approximation is likely caused by the presence of what may be two layers of ice sandwiched between the oceans.

So, could there be life on Ganymede? Hubble found evidence of a tenuous oxygen atmosphere in 1996, but it would be far too thin to support life (or, at least as we know it). We’ll have to wait and see if Juice can freshly squeeze anything more concrete when it arrives there, more than 15 years from now. In addition, Saur said that the aruoral technique used for Ganymede can help identify life-friendly water on other planets (or moons) with subsurface oceans outside the Solar System. Hubble isn’t powerful enough to capture these auroras yet, however it's only a matter of time, as more powerful instruments - like the James Webb Space Telescope, due in orbit in 2018 - are on their way.

Enceladus, meanwhile, is slightly different. We know it has water of some kind on it, as it has a crust of fresh, white ice, of thicknesses stretching from 30 to 40km. This gives it a high albedo, meaning it shines light brightly back into space; and it, too, is believed to be hiding a secret, warm, liquid ocean beneath its surface. Ever since Nasa’s Cassini spacecraft first discovered water vapour and ice spewing from vents near the moon’s south pole in 2005, researchers have theorised about the possible presence of liquid water there. 

On Earth, the kind of hydrothermal activity that would cause the ejection of water from vents tends to happen when seawater interacts with gaps in the planetary crust, so the Cassini data seemed to suggest this was what was happening on Enceladus as well. This deduction was strengthened further by the detection of methane in the plumes, and microscopic granules of silica - exactly the kinds of materials that should be generated around underwater vents.

In a Nasa statement, Sean Hsu, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Colorado and the lead author of the paper published in Nature, said: "It's very exciting that we can use these tiny grains of rock, spewed into space by geysers, to tell us about conditions on - and beneath - the ocean floor of an icy moon." Cassini hit the jackpot with the detection of silicates, which are believed to have come from inside the vents and then became wedged in icy structures called clathrates before being fired upwards into space. It indicates that these volcanic vents are still active, and generating new silicates - and that they're therefore also likely to still be warm enough to support microbial life, if it exists there.

This evidence all strongly suggests that Enceladus contains within it a 10km-deep ocean, with temperatures as high as 90oC in some parts - any little critters down there just have to swim to the hot bit to get to someplace comfy (though the chances of anything bigger than single-cell organisms existing there are extraordinarily slim). Enceladus and Ganymede are now part of a growing list of strong candidates for hosting alien microbial life, as well as Neptune’s moon Triton and Jupiter’s other moon Europa, as well as the dwarf planet Ceres.

Tosin Thompson writes about science and was the New Statesman's 2015 Wellcome Trust Scholar. 

Lifestage
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Everything that is wrong with the app Facebook doesn't want over 21s to download

Facebook's new teen-only offering, Lifestage, is just like your mum: it's trying too hard to relate and it doesn't care for your privacy.

Do you know the exact moment Facebook became uncool? Designed as a site to connect college students in 2004, the social network enjoyed nearly a decade of rapid, unrivalled growth before one day your mum – yes, your mum – using the same AOL email address she’s had since her dial-up days, logged on. And then she posted a Minion meme about drinking wine.

Facebook knows it’s uncool. It had a decline in active users in 2014, and in 2015 a survey of 4,485 teens discovered it came seventh in a ranking of ten social apps in terms of coolness. In fact, only 8 per cent of its users are aged between 13 and 19. This is the main reason the corporation have now created Lifestage, an app specifically for under-21s to “share a visual profile of who [they] are with [their] school network”.

Here’s how it works. After signing up and selecting their school, users are prompted to create a series of short videos – of their facial expressions, things they like, and things they dislike – that make up their profile. Once 20 people from any school sign up, that school is unlocked, meaning everyone within it can access one another’s profiles as well as those from nearby schools. Unlike Snapchat (and truly, this is the only thing that is unlike Snapchat) there is no chat function, but teens can put in their phone number and Instagram handles in order to talk. Don’t worry, though, there are still vomit-rainbows.

But with this new development, rather than hosting your mum, Facebook has become her. Lifestage is not only an embarrassing attempt to be Down With The Kids via the medium of poop emoji, it is also an invasive attempt to pry into their personal lives. Who’s your best friend? What do you like? What’s not cool? These are all questions the app wants teens to answer, in its madcap attempt to both appeal to children and analyse them.

“Post what you are into right now – and replace the video in that field whenever you want,” reads the app description on the iTunes store. “It's not just about the happy moments – build a video profile of the things you like, but also things you don’t like.” They might as well have written: “Tell us what’s cool. Please.”

Yet this is more than an innocent endeavour to hashtag relate, and is a very real attempt, like Facebook’s many others, to collect as much data on users as possible. Teens – no matter how many hot pink splashes and cartoon toilet rolls are used to infantilise them – are smart enough to have figured this out, with one of the 16 reviews of the app on the iTunes store titled “Kinda Sorta Creepy”, and another, by a user called Lolzeka, reading:

“I don't like how much information you have to give out. I don't want my phone number to be known nor do I want everyone to know my Instagram and Snapchat. I could not figure out how to take a picture or why my school was needed. Like I said, I don't want all my information out there.”

But Facebook already knows everything about everyone ever, and it’s not this data-mining that is the most concerning element of the app. It is the fact that – on an app specifically designed for children as young as 13 to share videos of themselves – there is no user verification process. “We can't confirm that people who claim to go to a certain school actually go to that school,” Facebook readily admits.

Although the USP of this app is that those over the age of 21 can only create a profile and aren’t allowed to view others, there isn’t a failsafe way to determine a user’s age. There is nothing to stop anyone faking both their age and the school they go to in order to view videos of, and connect with, teens.

Yet even without anyone suspicious lurking in the shadows, the app’s privacy settings have already come under scrutiny. The disclaimer says all videos uploaded to Lifestage are “fully public content” and “there is no way to limit the audience of your videos”. Despite the fact it is designed to connect users within schools, videos can be seen anyone, regardless of their school, and are “viewable by everyone”.

Of course none of this matters if teens don’t actually bother to use the app, which is currently only available in the US. Lifestage’s creator, 19-year-old Michael Sayman, designed it as a “way to take Facebook from 2004 and bring it to 2016”. Although he has the successful app 4Snaps under his belt, there is no guarantee Lifestage will succeed where Facebook’s other app attempts (Notify, Facebook Gifts, Poke) have not.

There are a few tricks Facebook has put in place to prompt the app to succeed, including the fact that users are ranked by how active they are, and those who don’t post enough updates will be labelled with a frowning or (here we go again) poop emoji. Still, this hardly seems enough for an app whose distinguishing feature is “Privacy? Nah.” 

Only time will tell whether the app will appeal to teens, but one thing is certain: if it does, your mum is totally downloading it.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.