People are dying of cancer because they are worried about inconveniencing their doctor

There's low-hanging fruit in medicine yet.

A British Journal of Cancer paper published last week (pdf) reveals how many low-hanging fruit there are to fighting cancer in Britain today. For all that the public focus remains on cancer treatment as a field of cutting-edge medical science, much of the most important work is done in finding and treating cancer early. And that aim is far more easily achieved if people actually help get there.

A sample of over 4,000 people over 50 from England, Northern Ireland and Wales looked at barriers to symptomatic presentation. It asked why people might be put off going to a doctor even if they had a symptom which they knew might be serious. People in the UK were the most likely of the nations surveyed to not go to the doctor through embarrassment, fear of wasting the doctor's time, and worry about what the doctor might find. Of those, the most common reason was worry about wasting the doctors time: a full 34 per cent of those surveyed put off an appointment over that fear.

Putting all the reasons together, the UK had the highest mean barriers to "symptomatic presentation" — going to the doctor.

The authors conclude:

In the UK, interventions to promote early presentation might usefully focus on addressing awareness of the age-related risk and increasing the public’s confidence to approach the GP with possible cancer symptoms.

It's easy to forget how simple some of the most important things in medicine are, but people are dying of cancer in Britain because they are worried about inconveniencing the doctor. That probably shouldn't continue to happen.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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