NASA signs $17m deal for ISS expansion

Commercial partnership will deliver the new module.

NASA is building an extension to the International Space Station, the agency announced this week. It has awarded a $17.8m contract to Bigelow Aerospace to build the "Bigelow Expandable Activity Module".

Bigelow is company which specialises in expandable – inflatable, basically – orbital habitats. The module on the ISS is intended to be a trial run for the viability of that technology for future exploration, and commercial, endeavours.

NASA's Deputy Administrator, Lori Garver, said:

This partnership agreement for the use of expandable habitats represents a step forward in cutting-edge technology that can allow humans to thrive in space safely and affordably, and heralds important progress in U.S. commercial space innovation.

The inflatable technology allows much bigger habitats to be shipped in the same rockets that are currently used for launching standard ISS modules. A comparison on Bigelow's website shows one of their proposed modules, a BA 330, alongside an ISS module:

Mark Thompson, writing for Sen, explained the technology behind the proposals:

At the heart of the inflatable technology is a material called Vectran, twice as strong as Kevlar and present in several layers of the 15cm thick skin of the Genesis craft. The flexible nature of the material results in further added safety for potential station inhabitants, a benefit supported by laboratory tests. It was found that micrometeoroids that would puncture the rigid skin of the International Space Station only penetrated half way through the skin of the Genesis craft.

Tangentially relevant, but I've wanted to get it on the site for weeks, this video of Commander Sunita Williams giving a tour of the ISS is the longest YouTube video I have watched all the way through, because it is astonishing. Imagine how much better it will be when there's an inflatable module of twice the size attached:

Bigelow's second prototype, Genesis II, in orbit. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Three’s adblocking trial is terrible news for journalism

Against a backdrop of editorial redundancies, it's hard to feel celebratory about the rise of adblocking. 

In a decision which will delight phone users but strike fear into media companies' hearts, the mobile provider Three is running an adblocking trial across its network from mid-June.

The company says it's considering adblocking as a way to improve its customers' privacy and reduce data costs, which makes sense, up to a point. Ads, especially video ads, can eat up mobile users' data and battery life, and can render already-clunky mobile websites practically unusable.

However, the move comes in a week where both new and old news organisations, the Telegraph and Vice, have laid off staff in a bid to make cost savings. These organisations rely (to differeing extents) on ad revenue. If readers aren't seeing ads, then whoever published and paid for that writing isn't making money, and probably won't be able to pay for that writing for much longer. 

The trial mirrors Apple's launch in September 2015 of an operating system which supported adblocker apps (which unsurprisingly shot up the Apple Store charts). At the time, I wrote about what this could mean for journalism:

Apple's move is just another which puts journalism at the mercy of giant tech companies. The consumption of media is already dictated by the whims of Google's algorithm, with publications forced to redesign sites and tweak content to ensure they rank highly and are indexed by the search engine.

Apple, notorious in the industry for its fanged response to attacks in the press, will now select its own news for readers via its news app. And media producers may now be forced to turn to social media sites like Facebook, where adblockers have less power, to market or even publish their content. 

Without ads, media companies will need to find other revenue streams, which could include subscription or paywall models - great if they work - or more sponsored posts by companies. 

Ads certainly need to become more user-friendly, and Three makes a good point when it argues that advertisers should pay for the data costs of their ads. But if you were saddened by the editorial redundancies across the media this week, take pause before you celebrate the rise of adblocking. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.