Mormons and gay marriage

According to Mormon doctrine, homosexual is not a noun but rather an adjective to be applied to eith

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints officially announced this week its support for an amendment to California's constitution that would effectively ban gay marriage in one of the nation's most liberal states.

In a letter to be read out in Mormon churches all across California, LDS leaders urged members to “do all you can ... by donating of your means and time to assure that marriage is legally defined as being between a man and a woman”.

Although the church's actions really shouldn't come as a shock to anyone — Mormons have, after all, made no secret of their stance against same-sex marriage — the LDS Church's latest round of sabre-rattling has done little to clarify its somewhat complicated stance on homosexuality in general.

The LDS Church isn't anti-gay, per se. According to Mormon doctrine, homosexual is not a noun used to label a person, but rather an adjective to be applied to either actions or feelings. Therefore there are no homosexuals, only people with homosexual inclinations. Act on said inclinations, however, and you'll likely have some explaining to do.

It breaks down like this: openly homosexual Mormons are able, even encouraged, to participate fully in church ordinances provided they, like the rest of the unmarried population, abstain from sexual activity. In that sense, they are my brothers and sisters in both faith and a lifetime of sexual frustration. Dungeons and Dragons party at my house!

There is, however, that which will always separate openly gay Mormons from the hopelessly single like me: marriage. While traditional marriage is pushed on straight LDS churchgoers like new cell phone plans or free trial offers, the Mormon Church's stance on same-sex unions leaves their homosexual counterparts with little hope of hearing wedding bells in their futures.

Furthermore, if any member were to engage in homosexual activity, he or she would run the risk of facing disciplinary action from the church. The member in question would always be welcome in the congregation, but would likely have some privileges curtailed. It's hardly an ideal situation for homosexual Mormons, but at least no one is trying to stone them Leviticus-style anymore, right?

My views on same-sex marriage are a little more complicated. Because coming out (no pun intended) in open defiance of Mormon doctrine would doubtlessly lead to my arrest and subsequent reprogramming a la George's Orwell's 1984, I'll sidestep the theological minefield by saying I just don't see same-sex marriage as a religious issue.

Granted, the Bible is abundantly clear in its denunciation of hot, man-on-man action, but I still don't think any organisation — secular, religious or otherwise — ought to have a say in anything as intimate as a relationship between consenting adults.

While some Mormons back in Salt Lake will argue otherwise after reading this piece, I believe that your right to swing your fist ends precisely where my nose begins. In other words, we ought to be able to do as we please provided our actions don't detract from others' quality of life. If I, like some ill-informed right-wingers, believed same-sex marriage would unavoidably lead to hundreds of gays and lesbians having a Roman orgy on my kitchen floor, I might rethink my stance on the subject.

Even if homosexual activity is an express train to hell, who are we to stop others from boarding? I believe we will all be judged according to our own screw-ups, not those of our neighbours. Besides, I suspect a lot of us straight folk will one day find that we have seat reservations in precisely the same car.

Know Your Meme / New Statesman
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Living the Meme: what life is like for the internet famous

A series of articles exploring what happens to people after they go viral.

Memes are many things to many people. They are screenshots, videos, pictures, cartoons, sayings, catchphrases and, most importantly, dogs. 

But more often than not, there is a real human being behind each of the memes we come to know and love. How does it feel to have your face unwittingly thrust in the limelight, available online for all to see? How do children who go viral online feel as they grow up? When does the internet fame end and normal life resume? Just how much money can a meme make anyway?

"Living the Meme" is a series of articles in which I interview the stars of viral images and videos to find out the answers to these questions, and more. 

Check out the individual stories here:

What happened to Azeem's flute recital?

In 2015, over 100,000 Britons RSVP'd to a University of California student's flute recital. One year later, he discusses how life has - and hasn't - changed. 

What happened to One Pound Fish man?

Muhammad Shahid Nazir Ahmad appeared on The X Factor after his song about "very, very nice" fish went viral. But are rumours of his deportation true?

What happened to that guy who filmed a double rainbow?

"What does it mean?" asked Paul Vasquez when he filmed a double rainbow in the sky. Seven years later, he's still asking the same question. 

What happened to David after David After the Dentist?

How does going viral aged seven affect you as you become a teenager? David DeVore explains.

What happened to Success Kid?

Nine years after his baby picture became a meme, Sammy Griner says he wants to be known for more than just the photo.

What happened to the Ermahgerd girl?

Maggie Goldenberger reveals that she is not the Ermahgerd girl - not really. 

To suggest an interviewee for Living the Meme, contact Amelia on Twitter.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.