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Jeremy Corbyn quotes Enver Hoxha at Labour party Christmas party

The Labour leader quoted the Albanian dictator at the party's Christmas bash, who he dubbed "a tough leader".

Jeremy Corbyn stunned attendees at Labour's staff Christmas party by quoting Enver Hoxha, the Albanian dictator who served as chairman of the Democratic Front of Albania and commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces from 1944 until his death in 1985. 

Dubbing Hoxha a "tough ruler", Corbyn quoted Hoxha's phrase that "this year will be tougher than last year". Hoxha is believed to have imprisoned, tortured or executed at least 100,000 Albanians during his reign. 

The party - thrown for both current staff and veterans of the 2015 election campaign - was stunned by the remarks, which will raise memories of John McDonnell's decision to quote Mao Zedong's Little Red Book in the House of Commons. One attendee described the reaction as "awkward laughter". Others had to Google the autocrat, who is a relatively-obscure figure in Britain. The row over Mao overshadowed Conservative U-Turns on cuts to tax credits and the social security budget.

Others defended Corbyn, however. One staffer said that "he was trying his best to speak to a room of people who he will never like or trust and who will never like or trust him".  The remark is believed to have been in jest.

UPDATE 10/12/2015:

Simon Mirakaj, head of the Albanian Institute of Formerly Persecuted People, has been in touch with the New Statesman. Mirakaj, who was personally imprisoned for 44 years, described Hoxha as leaving an "unhealed wound" on Albanian society, who "filled the streets of Albania with tears and blood" and condemned the joke.

"In my family, the 'tough leader' sentenced us together to 950 years [in aggregate] of prison, forced labour camps and executions. [In Albania] there are 6000 people executed with and without a judicial process and we still haven't found their graves, we have had 30,000 political prisoners and 200,000 people put in labour camps." 

That the remark was intended as a joke recieved short shrift from Mirakaj. He said: "In September 2014 our country was visited by Pope Francis. This was his first visit in Europe. He didn’t choose Albania as a developed country. He chose Albania for the reason this country suffered most during communism."

"There is no bigger insult for the Catholic Church," he added, "That in a Christmas party a name of a dictator such as Enver Hoxha is quoted." 

It remains Labour party policy not to comment on private gatherings. 

I'm grateful to ABC's Vincent Triest, who put Simon Mirakaj in touch with the New Statesman. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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