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Journalists publicly mock Emma Watson’s breasts – therefore proving her point about feminism

“Bit small and flat.”

Yes, it’s Incident #9486538476538 in the “BUT FEMINISTS CAN’T LOOK NICE?!” (ie. Women Are Not Allowed To Make Decisions About Their Own Bodies) log.

The actor Emma Watson has done an interview with Vanity Fair, illustrated with a photoshoot of her in designer versions of theatrical costumes: a Shakespearean ruff, various floor-length gowns, a baggy checked double-breasted jacket, a fencing uniform.

The Sun being The Sun picked out the shot where she is the least covered-up (a kind of white thick netted bolero thingy) for a puff piece about the interview. A photo that is not really representative of the rather classical shoot, which features a far-less-dressed male model in pictures alongside Watson.

But that didn’t stop the broadcaster and titfinder-general Julia Hartley-Brewer taking issue with the Vanity Fair shoot. Well, two parts of it:

“Emma Watson: ‘Feminism, feminism... gender wage gap... why oh why am I not taken seriously... feminism... oh, and here are my tits!’” tweeted Hartley-Brewer, ever vocally offended by people she accuses of being oversensitive.

Enter Times journalist and Britain’s most enraged attender of restaurants Giles Coren, who retweeted the comment and replied: “That dim-witted, attention-seeking hoyden doesn't just give feminists a bad name, she gives THE HUMAN RACE a bad name.”

This descended into a bizarre public rating of the actor’s breasts:

Your mole would like to point out the irony in attempting to undermine the actor’s feminist credentials by OBJECTIFYING HER BODY AND CRITICISING HER CHOICES. As if we needed any further proof of the need for feminism.

Read more: It's great that Emma Watson is standing up for feminism - but #HeforShe is the wrong approach

I'm a mole, innit.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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