Labour's next leader? Photo: Getty Images
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Jeremy Corbyn given huge lead in new poll of Labour leadership voters

A YouGov poll for the Times confirms figures seen by the New Statesman - the veteran left-winger is far ahead in overall votes, and would win a run-off with Andy Burnham.

Jeremy Corbyn is far ahead of his rivals in the Labour leadership election, a YouGov poll for the Times has revealed. 

The veteran leftwinger, who only scraped onto the ballot paper in the final few minutes before close of nominations, tops the poll in the first round with 43 per cent of the vote.  

In the first round, Andy Burnham is in second with 26 per cent of the vote. Yvette Cooper is in third with 20 per cent. And Liz Kendall is in fourth place with 11 per cent of the vote. After transfers, he defeats Burnham, considered by many to be the frontrunner, by 53 per cent to 47 per cent.  

YouGov, who accurately called the result of the last Labour leadership election, surveyed party members, affliated supporters, and registered trade unionists to compile the poll, which echoes figures seen by the New Statesman last week. In a second survey by YouGov, Tom Watson emerges as the winner in the deputy race, winning in the first round before going on to triumph overall.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

New Statesman
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.