Sad Clegg. Photo: Dave Thompson/Getty
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How many Lib Dems have lost their seats in the 2015 general election?

The Lib Dems went from 57 to eight seats.

In what Nick Clegg has called a "cruel and punishing night" for the party, the Liberal Democrats have lost the majority of their seats, including several senior politicans and ministers such as the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Danny Alexander, Energy Secretary Ed Davey and Business Secretary Vince Cable. Nick Clegg held his Sheffield Hallam seat, but resigned as leader. An exit poll suggested the party could lose 47 seats in the House of Commons. The party now have only one MP left in London, and lost nearly £150,000 in parliamentary deposits.

49 Lib Dems lost their seats:

 

  • Robert Smith, Aberdeenshire West & Kincardine (to Stuart Donaldson - SNP)
     
  • Brendan O'Hara, Argyll & Bute (to Brendan O'Hara - SNP)
     
  • Steve Bradley, Bath (to Ben Howlett - Conservative)
     
  • Simon Hughes, Bermondsey & Old Southwark (to Neil Coyle - Labour)
     
  • Michael Moore, Berwickshire, Roxburgh & Selkirk (to Calum Kerr, SNP)
     
  • John Hemming, Birmingham Yardley (to Jess Phillips - Labour)
     
  • David Ward, Bradford East (to Imran Hussain - Labour)
     
  • Roger Williams, Brecon & Radnorshire (to Christopher Davies - Conservative)
     
  • Lauren Keith, Brent Central (to Dawn Butler, Labour)
     
  • Stephen Williams, Bristol West (to Thangam Debbonaire, Labour)
     
  • Gordon Birtwistle, Burnley (to Julie Cooper, Labour)
     
  • John Thurso, Caithness, Sutherland & Easter Ross (to Paul Monaghan, SNP)
     
  • Julian Huppert, Cambridge (to Daniel Zeichner, Labour)
     
  • Jenny Willott, Cardiff Central (to Jo Stevens, Labour)
     
  • Mark Hunter, Cheadle (to Mary Robinson, Conservative)
     
  • Martin Horwood, Cheltenham (t0 Alex Chalk, Conservative)
     
  • Duncan Hames, Chippenham (to Michelle Donelan, Conservative)
     
  • Bob Russell, Colchester (to Will Quince, Conservative)
     
  • Dan Rogerson, Cornwall North (to Scott Mann, Conservative)
     
  • Nick Harvey, Devon North (to Peter Heaton-Jones, Conservative)
     
  • Vikki Slade, Dorset Mid & Poole North (to Michael Tomlinson, Conservative)
     
  • Jo Swinson, Dunbartonshire East (to John Nicolson, SNP)
     
  • Stephen Lloyd, Eastbourne (to Caroline Ansell, Conservative)
     
  • Mike Thornton, Eastleight (to Mims Davies, Conservative)
     
  • Mike Crockart, Edinburgh West (Michelle Thomson, SNP)
     
  • Tim Brett, Fife North East (to Stephen Gethins, SNP)
     
  • Christine Jardine, Gordon (to Alex Salmond, SNP)
     
  • Lisa Smart, Hazel Grove (to William Wragg, Conservative)
     
  • Lynne Featherstone, Hornsey and Wood Green (to Catherine West, Labour)
     
  • Danny Alexander, Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey (to Drew Hendry, SNP)
     
  • Ed Davey, Kingston and Surbiton Davey (to James Berry, Conservative
     
  • Norman Baker, Lewes (to Maria Caulfield, Conservative)
     
  • John Leech, Manchester Withington (to Jeff Smith, Labour)
     
  • Simon Wright, Norwich South (to Clive Lewis, Labour)
     
  • Gerald Vernon-Jackson, Portsmouth South (to Flick Drummond, Conservative)
     
  • Josh Mason, Redcar (to Anna Turley, Labour)
     
  • Charles Kennedy, Ross, Skye & Lochaber (to Ian Blackford, SNP)
     
  • Lorely Burt, Solihull (to Julian Knight, Conservative)
     
  • David Rendel, Somerton & Frome (to David Warburton, Conservative)
     
  • Stephen Gilbert, St Austell & Newquay (to Steve Double, Conservative)
     
  • Paul Burstow, Sutton & Cheam (to Paul Burstow, Conservative)
     
  • Rachel Gilmour, Taunton Deane (to Rebecca Pow, Conservative)
     
  • Steven Webb, Thornbury and Yate (to Luke Hall, Conservative)
     
  • Adrian Sanders, Torbay (to Kevin Foster, Conservative)
     
  • Vince Cable, Twickenham (to Tania Mathias, Conservative)
     
  • Tessa Munt, Wells (to James Heappey, Conservative)
     
  • David Laws, Yeovil (to Marcus Fysh, Conservative)
     
  • Jeremy Browne, Taunton Deane (to Rebecca Pow, Conservative)
     
  • Andrew George, St Ives (to Derek Thomas, Conservative)

 

Held:

 

  • Tom Brake, Carshalton and Wallington
     
  • Mark Williams, Ceredigion
     
  • Greg Mulholland, Leeds North West
     
  • Alistair Carmichael, Orkney and Shetland
     
  • Norman Lamb, Norfolk North
     
  • Nick Clegg, Sheffield Hallam
     
  • John Pugh, Southport
     
  • Tim Farron, Westmorland & Lonsdale

 

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.

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Rarely has it mattered so little if Manchester United won; rarely has it been so special they did

Team's Europa League victory offers chance for sorely needed celebration of a city's spirit.

Carlo Ancelotti, the Bayern Munich manager, memorably once said that football is “the most important of the least important things”, but he was only partly right. While it is absolutely the case that a bunch of people chasing around a field is insignificant, a bunch of people chasing around a field is not really what football is about.

At a football match can you set aside the strictures that govern real life and freely scream, shout and cuddle strangers. Football tracks life with such unfailing omnipresence, garnishing the mundane with regular doses of drama and suspense; football is amazing, and even when it isn’t there’s always the possibility that it’s about to be.

Football bestows primal paroxysms of intense, transcendent ecstasy, shared both with people who mean everything and people who mean nothing. Football carves out time for people it's important to see and delivers people it becomes important to see. Football is a structure with folklore, mythology, language and symbols; being part of football is being part of something big, special, and eternal. Football is the best thing in the world when things go well, and still the best thing in the world when they don’t. There is nothing remotely like it. Nothing.

Football is about community and identity, friends and family; football is about expression and abandon, laughter and song; football is about love and pride. Football is about all the beauty in the world.

And the world is a beautiful place, even though it doesn’t always seem that way – now especially. But in the horror of terror we’ve seen amazing kindness, uplifting unity and awesome dignity which is the absolute point of everything.

In Stockholm last night, 50,000 or so people gathered for a football match, trying to find a way of celebrating all of these things. Around town before the game the atmosphere was not as boisterous as usual, but in the ground the old conviction gradually returned. The PA played Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds, an Ajax staple with lyrics not entirely appropriate: there is plenty about which to worry, and for some every little thing is never going to be alright.

But somehow the sentiment felt right and the Mancunian contingent joined in with gusto, following it up with “We’ll never die,” – a song of defiance born from the ashes of the Munich air disaster and generally aired at the end of games, often when defeat is imminent. Last night it was needed from the outset, though this time its final line – “we’ll keep the red flag flying high, coz Man United will never die" – was not about a football team but a city, a spirit, and a way of life. 

Over the course of the night, every burst of song and even the minute's silence chorused with that theme: “Manchester, Manchester, Manchester”; “Manchester la la la”; “Oh Manchester is wonderful”. Sparse and simple words, layered and complex meanings.

The match itself was a curious affair. Rarely has it mattered so little whether or not United won; rarely has it been so special that they did. Manchester United do not represent or appeal to everyone in Manchester but they epitomise a similar brilliance to Manchester, brilliance which they take to the world. Brilliance like youthfulness, toughness, swagger and zest; brilliance which has been to the fore these last three days, despite it all.

Last night they drew upon their most prosaic aspects, outfighting and outrunning a willing but callow opponent to win the only trophy to have eluded them. They did not make things better, but they did bring happiness and positivity at a time when happiness and positivity needed to be brought; football is not “the most important of the least important things,” it is the least important of the most important things.

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