Lucy Powell, who has been named vice chair of Labour's election campaign, speaks in parliament. Photograph: BBC.
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Miliband promotes key allies Lucy Powell and Jon Trickett in Labour reshuffle

Powell is named vice chair of the election campaign with left-winger Trickett made a senior adviser. 

With just six months remaining until the general election, Ed Miliband has brought some of his most loyal allies to the centre. That is the key theme of tonight's Labour shadow cabinet reshuffle.

Lucy Powell, who managed Miliband's leadership campaign and later served as his deputy chief of staff, has been promoted from shadow childcare minister to shadow cabinet office minister (joining the shadow cabinet as a full member) and has also been named vice chair of the general election campaign (operations).

As well as giving greater prominence to one of the most talented and impressive young MPs (she entered parliament after the Manchester Central by-election in November 2012), the move addresses complaints about the lack of women involved in the election team and puts Miliband just one move away from his target of a gender-balanced shadow cabinet (of those attending, 17 are men and 15 are women). I tipped her for promotion back in July.

With Powell taking on responsibility for election operations, the appointment has been seen by some in the party as a snub to campaign chair Douglas Alexander, who retains control of strategy. One MP told me: "Douglas is the loser from this reshuffle." 

The other most significant move is the appointment of shadow minister without portfolio and deputy chair Jon Trickett as a senior adviser in the leader's office. Expect Trickett, a proud socialist and the voice of the left in the shadow cabinet, to focus on ensuring Miliband doesn't lose his radical edge.

Like Powell, the working class Hemsworth MP played a key role in Miliband's leadership campaign, providing the psephological analysis (the "five million votes" lost between 1997 and 2010) that convinced him to break with New Labour. Indeed, long before that, in 2005, Trickett, who studied under Ralph Miliband at Leeds University, told Miliband that he should he think of himself as a future leader. 

In a recent piece for The Staggers, he wrote:

You only need to see the failure of the international banking system, or the dismal record of the British housing market, or to look to the American health system to see how private provision of social goods can fail. And yet you could be mistaken in believing that they are incontestable truths.

So deeply entrenched are these ideas that it is easier to imagine the end of our planet (or at least the end of humanity as a result of some disaster) than it is to imagine that we human beings can build a different kind of country with a different set of values.

But that has to be our task. And it may not be as hard to achieve as we imagine.

Because most people know that the present system is bust. There is a spirit of dissent in the country. It is the common sense of our times that Britain is not working properly for the millions, though it works well for the millionaires.

There is a cynicism about the media who perpetually fail to report the truth as most people experience it. And there is contempt for a Westminster government which is seen as remote and failing to address the fact that so many are feeling increasingly hard up.

In other changes, Mary Creagh has replaced Jim Murphy (who resigned from the shadow cabinet on Sunday in order to focus on his Scottish leadership campaign) as shadow international development secretary with Michael Dugher replacing her as shadow transport secretary. In addition, Anas Sarwar, who stood down as Scottish Labour deputy leader last week, has been named shadow international development minister with Alison McGovern, who previously held the role, taking Powell's place as shadow minister for children and families. 

Here's the new shadow cabinet in full. 


Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Labour Party
Ed Miliband MP

Shadow Deputy Prime Minister, Party Chair and Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
Harriet Harman MP

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer
Ed Balls MP

Shadow Foreign Secretary and Chair of General Election Campaign (Strategy)
Douglas Alexander MP

Shadow Home Secretary
Yvette Cooper MP

Shadow Lord Chancellor, Secretary of State for Justice and Shadow Minister for London
Sadiq Khan MP

Opposition Chief Whip
Rosie Winterton MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Health
Andy Burnham MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills
Chuka Umunna MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions 
Rachel Reeves MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Education 
Tristram Hunt MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
Vernon Coaker MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
Hilary Benn MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
Caroline Flint MP

Shadow Leader of the House of Commons and Chair of the National Policy Forum
Angela Eagle MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
Michael Dugher MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
Ivan Lewis MP

Shadow Secretary of State for International Development
Mary Creagh MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland
Margaret Curran MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Wales 
Owen Smith MP

Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Maria Eagle MP

Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office
Lucy Powell MP 

Shadow Minister without Portfolio and Deputy Party Chair
Jon Trickett MP

Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities
Gloria De Piero MP

Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
Chris Leslie MP

Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

Lords Chief Whip 
Lord Bassam of Brighton

Also attending Shadow Cabinet:

Shadow Minister for Care and Older People
Liz Kendall MP

Shadow Minister for Housing
Emma Reynolds

Shadow Attorney General
Emily Thornberry MP

Shadow Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
Lord Wood of Anfield

Coordinator of the Labour Party Policy Review
Jon Cruddas MP

In addition:

Lucy Powell becomes Vice Chair of the General Election Campaign (Operations)

 

Alison McGovern becomes Shadow Minister for Children and Families

 

Anas Sarwar becomes Shadow Minister for International Development

 

Jon Trickett will also be part of the Leader’s Office as a senior adviser

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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