"The NHS is being hollowed out from within; that's not efficiency." Photo: Getty
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NHS reform and the hollow marketisation myth

A metamorphosis is taking place; a mutation of the NHS from a public service into a lucrative marketplace.

When the chief executive of NHS England produces a 39-page, 15,000-word rescue plan for the health service that, a senior doctor later told me, “doesn’t even mention the real problem in the system”, you know something is up.

Not that it’s any great surprise. Simon Stevens isn’t likely to agree with my source that the real problem in the NHS is a prevailing ideological dogma that “private is good and public is bad” among top brass, nor that the aggressive marketisation programme currently underway is all based on a myth. The private healthcare man turned NHS-saviour has only been in his post for seven months after 10 years at global giant United Health Group, and old habits die hard.

But the real paradox at the heart of Stevens’ five-year plan is that he calls for ruthless efficiencies and then turns a blind eye to the sort of “grotesque financial waste” that consultant clinical oncologist and National Health Action Party (NHAP) co-leader Clive Peedell says is crippling the system.

Peedell says: “Wasteful internal markets, commissioning support units, management consultancy fees, the cost of procurement of clinical services, profit-taking by private providers, the cost of fragmenting pathways due to outsourcing components to private contractors, and PFI deals bankrupting our hospitals; they are draining billions from frontline care in our NHS”.

A metamorphosis is taking place; a mutation of the NHS from a public service into a lucrative marketplace. None of this is particularly new – but since the Health and Social Care Act kicked in two years ago, trusts have been legally obliged to compete with private providers over contracts, and take on the extra administrative costs of doing so. Allyson Pollock, professor of public health research at Queen Mary University of London, says: “It’s quite clear that the government wants to contract out as much as it can before the general election, but there’s no data about the costs for trusts such as lawyers and management consultants in doing this”.

And after a slow start, the scrum has really kicked in now. Campaign group NHS Support Federation has recorded five times more contracts coming onto the market between July and September this year, a cool £2bn’s worth, than in the first three months of life under the Health and Social Care Act when only £266m was up for grabs. Bound by competition laws, NHS trusts find themselves in the position of having to spend tens, maybe hundreds of thousands bidding to carry on running services they already deliver, or, even worse, to then lose out to private providers that have cherry-picked the contracts and put all of their corporate weight behind winning them.

Take Cambridgeshire and Peterborough for example, where a million pounds of taxpayer money was wasted on the procurement process of older people’s healthcare and adult community health services before the CCG finally decided that Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust should carry on running the service.

Why are such tremendous burdens being overlooked by Stevens? Or the hideous levels repayments for the same PFI loans he advocated when he had Tony Blair’s ear back in the noughties? Why no mention of the £4.5bn a year that Calum Paton, Professor of Public Policy at Keele University, conservatively estimates is the cost of administering an internal market he describes as “costly and of dubious effectiveness”, or the extortionate legal fees just being in that market forces trusts to stump up?

GP and anti-privatisation campaigner Dr Bob Gill says: “A market doesn’t work in healthcare; the administration of it just drives up costs. The NHS is being hollowed out from within, assisted by people from banking and the private sector who are dumbing down the service and delivering everything as cheaply as possible. That’s not efficiency”.

Neither is, Gill argues, a system in which a hollowed-out NHS has to pay when those private companies fail in their duty. Private companies like Vanguard Healthcare, which had its contract with Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton terminated after a series of post-surgery complications, leaving Musgrove medical director Dr Colin Close admitting, “any financial responsibility would rest with us”.

How is all this playing out? Kathryn Anderson is a nurse at the Royal Free Hospital and NHAP general election candidate – in Iain Duncan Smith’s constituency. She says that far from bringing in greater efficiency or care, these new wasteful costs are having the opposite effect in the wards. “All that money comes from the frontline,” she says. “It comes from nurses and HCAs and doctors’ pay, and from drugs that don’t get purchased. You can’t run the NHS and expect it to perform if you flush the money out of the system, it just doesn’t work. We see this every day and it’s getting worse”.

The Conservatives are keeping very quiet about all this, perhaps wisely. With one hand Lansley and Hunt have enforced pay freezes on frontline staff claiming the pot is empty, and with the other, enforced an extortionate tendering process that has wasted vital funds. Just the cost of the top-down reorganisation alone, which a senior Tory MP recently described as the party’s “biggest mistake” in government, is estimated at £3bn.

On the pretext that the NHS is an egregious waste of public money – despite the fact that in 2012 the UK spent less on healthcare as a percentage of GDP than any other G7 country – the system has been altered from within. The result is a conduit to a £100bn-a-year pot with an NHS stamp on the side, which through some alchemy turns taxpayer money into private profits.

Stevens’ five-year plan is full of hope and some entirely sensible ideas to improve the system. But with no mention of any of the debilitating costs of running the new marketised system, which Unite head of health Rachael Maskell says could be as high as £1bn by the time of the election, nor the outcry from the profession about marketisation which the BMA itself is campaigning to see reversed in law, it seems a little hollow to say the least.

Benedict Cooper is a freelance journalist who covers medical politics and the NHS. He tweets @Ben_JS_Cooper.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Andrea Leadsom as Environment Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

A little over a week into Andrea Leadsom’s new role as Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), and senior industry figures are already questioning her credentials. A growing list of campaigners have called for her resignation, and even the Cabinet Office implied that her department's responsibilities will be downgraded.

So far, so bad.

The appointment would appear to be something of a consolation prize, coming just days after Leadsom pulled out of the Conservative leadership race and allowed Theresa May to enter No 10 unopposed.

Yet while Leadsom may have been able to twist the truth on her CV in the City, no amount of tampering will improve the agriculture-related side to her record: one barely exists. In fact, recent statements made on the subject have only added to her reputation for vacuous opinion: “It would make so much more sense if those with the big fields do the sheep, and those with the hill farms do the butterflies,” she told an audience assembled for a referendum debate. No matter the livelihoods of thousands of the UK’s hilltop sheep farmers, then? No need for butterflies outside of national parks?

Normally such a lack of experience is unsurprising. The department has gained a reputation as something of a ministerial backwater; a useful place to send problematic colleagues for some sobering time-out.

But these are not normal times.

As Brexit negotiations unfold, Defra will be central to establishing new, domestic policies for UK food and farming; sectors worth around £108bn to the economy and responsible for employing one in eight of the population.

In this context, Leadsom’s appointment seems, at best, a misguided attempt to make the architects of Brexit either live up to their promises or be seen to fail in the attempt.

At worst, May might actually think she is a good fit for the job. Leadsom’s one, water-tight credential – her commitment to opposing restraints on industry – certainly has its upsides for a Prime Minister in need of an alternative to the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP); a policy responsible for around 40 per cent the entire EU budget.

Why not leave such a daunting task in the hands of someone with an instinct for “abolishing” subsidies  thus freeing up money to spend elsewhere?

As with most things to do with the EU, CAP has some major cons and some equally compelling pros. Take the fact that 80 per cent of CAP aid is paid out to the richest 25 per cent of farmers (most of whom are either landed gentry or vast, industrialised, mega-farmers). But then offset this against the provision of vital lifelines for some of the UK’s most conscientious, local and insecure of food producers.

The NFU told the New Statesman that there are many issues in need of urgent attention; from an improved Basic Payment Scheme, to guarantees for agri-environment funding, and a commitment to the 25-year TB eradication strategy. But that they also hope, above all, “that Mrs Leadsom will champion British food and farming. Our industry has a great story to tell”.

The construction of a new domestic agricultural policy is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for Britain to truly decide where its priorities for food and environment lie, as well as to which kind of farmers (as well as which countries) it wants to delegate their delivery.

In the context of so much uncertainty and such great opportunity, Leadsom has a tough job ahead of her. And no amount of “speaking as a mother” will change that.

India Bourke is the New Statesman's editorial assistant.