Bob Dylan and Joan Baez during the civil rights march on Washington, 1963. Photo: Getty.
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What is the greatest political song?

Which songs should make our forthcoming list?

Five years ago we published a list of the 20 greatest political songs. We had everything from Dylan and Marley to Billie Holiday and U2. We took a look at the stories behind each and the reasons for their success. You can take a look and listen to the list below.

Next month we are publishing an updated list – and new ones on the most political novels, films and works of art.

We want to include your choices. Should any of these 20 songs make this year’s list? Or is the greatest piece of political music missing?

You can vote and comment here.

1. Woody Guthrie - "This Land is your Land"
2. The Special AKA - "Free Nelson Mandela"
3. Bob Dylan - "The Times they are a-Changin'"
4. Billie Holiday - "Strange Fruit"
5. Claude de Lisle - "La Marseillaise"
6. U2 - "Sunday Bloody Sunday"
7. Eugène Pottier - "The Internationale"
8. Robert Wyatt/Elvis Costello - "Shipbuilding"
9. Sex Pistols - "God Save the Queen"
10. William Blake - "Jerusalem"
11. The Who - "Won't Get Fooled Again"
12. Rage Against the Machine - "Killing in the Name"
13. Tracy Chapman - "Talkin' 'bout a Revolution"
14. Nina Simone - "Mississippi Goddam"
15. Marvin Gaye - "What's Going On?"
16. Gil Scott-Heron - "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
17. Bob Marley - "Redemption Song"
18. John Lennon - "Imagine"
19. Pete Seeger - "Where Have All the Flowers Gone"
20. Tom Robinson - "Glad to be Gay"

Harry Lambert was the editor of May2015, the New Statesman's election website.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.