Bob Dylan and Joan Baez during the civil rights march on Washington, 1963. Photo: Getty.
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What is the greatest political song?

Which songs should make our forthcoming list?

Five years ago we published a list of the 20 greatest political songs. We had everything from Dylan and Marley to Billie Holiday and U2. We took a look at the stories behind each and the reasons for their success. You can take a look and listen to the list below.

Next month we are publishing an updated list – and new ones on the most political novels, films and works of art.

We want to include your choices. Should any of these 20 songs make this year’s list? Or is the greatest piece of political music missing?

You can vote and comment here.

1. Woody Guthrie - "This Land is your Land"
2. The Special AKA - "Free Nelson Mandela"
3. Bob Dylan - "The Times they are a-Changin'"
4. Billie Holiday - "Strange Fruit"
5. Claude de Lisle - "La Marseillaise"
6. U2 - "Sunday Bloody Sunday"
7. Eugène Pottier - "The Internationale"
8. Robert Wyatt/Elvis Costello - "Shipbuilding"
9. Sex Pistols - "God Save the Queen"
10. William Blake - "Jerusalem"
11. The Who - "Won't Get Fooled Again"
12. Rage Against the Machine - "Killing in the Name"
13. Tracy Chapman - "Talkin' 'bout a Revolution"
14. Nina Simone - "Mississippi Goddam"
15. Marvin Gaye - "What's Going On?"
16. Gil Scott-Heron - "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
17. Bob Marley - "Redemption Song"
18. John Lennon - "Imagine"
19. Pete Seeger - "Where Have All the Flowers Gone"
20. Tom Robinson - "Glad to be Gay"

Harry Lambert was the editor of May2015, the New Statesman's election website.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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