Bob Dylan and Joan Baez during the civil rights march on Washington, 1963. Photo: Getty.
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What is the greatest political song?

Which songs should make our forthcoming list?

Five years ago we published a list of the 20 greatest political songs. We had everything from Dylan and Marley to Billie Holiday and U2. We took a look at the stories behind each and the reasons for their success. You can take a look and listen to the list below.

Next month we are publishing an updated list – and new ones on the most political novels, films and works of art.

We want to include your choices. Should any of these 20 songs make this year’s list? Or is the greatest piece of political music missing?

You can vote and comment here.

1. Woody Guthrie - "This Land is your Land"
2. The Special AKA - "Free Nelson Mandela"
3. Bob Dylan - "The Times they are a-Changin'"
4. Billie Holiday - "Strange Fruit"
5. Claude de Lisle - "La Marseillaise"
6. U2 - "Sunday Bloody Sunday"
7. Eugène Pottier - "The Internationale"
8. Robert Wyatt/Elvis Costello - "Shipbuilding"
9. Sex Pistols - "God Save the Queen"
10. William Blake - "Jerusalem"
11. The Who - "Won't Get Fooled Again"
12. Rage Against the Machine - "Killing in the Name"
13. Tracy Chapman - "Talkin' 'bout a Revolution"
14. Nina Simone - "Mississippi Goddam"
15. Marvin Gaye - "What's Going On?"
16. Gil Scott-Heron - "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
17. Bob Marley - "Redemption Song"
18. John Lennon - "Imagine"
19. Pete Seeger - "Where Have All the Flowers Gone"
20. Tom Robinson - "Glad to be Gay"

Harry Lambert was the editor of May2015, the New Statesman's election website.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn bids for the NHS to rescue Labour

Ahead of tomorrow's by-elections, Corbyn damned Theresa May for putting the service in a "state of emergency".

Whenever Labour leaders are in trouble, they seek political refuge in the NHS. Jeremy Corbyn, whose party faces potential defeat in tomorrow’s Copeland and Stoke by-elections, upheld this iron law today. In the case of the former, Labour has already warned that “babies will die” as a result of the downgrading of the hospital. It is crude but it may yet prove effective (it worked for No to AV, after all).

In the chamber, Corbyn assailed May for cutting the number of hospital beds, worsening waiting times, under-funding social care and abolishing nursing bursaries. The Labour leader rose to a crescendo, damning the Prime Minister for putting the service in a “a state of emergency”. But his scattergun attack was too unfocused to much trouble May.

The Prime Minister came armed with attack lines, brandishing a quote from former health secretary Andy Burnham on cutting hospital beds and reminding Corbyn that Labour promised to spend less on the NHS at the last election (only Nixon can go to China). May was able to boast that the Tories were providing “more money” for the service (this is not, of course, the same as “enough”). Just as Corbyn echoed his predecessors, so the Prime Minister sounded like David Cameron circa 2013, declaring that she would not “take lessons” from the party that presided over the Mid-Staffs scandal and warning that Labour would “borrow and bankrupt” the economy.

It was a dubious charge from the party that has racked up ever-higher debt but a reliably potent one. Labour, however, will be satisfied that May was more comfortable debating the economy or attacking the Brown government, than she was defending the state of the NHS. In Copeland and Stoke, where Corbyn’s party has held power since 1935 and 1950, Labour must hope that the electorate are as respectful of tradition as its leader.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.