The Conservative MP Tracey Crouch.
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Tracey Crouch: “I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t disappointed not to be promoted”

The Conservative MP talks to Lucy Fisher about rebelling against the government, mindfulness and football.

“I have a secret wonkishness.” Tracey Crouch, the football-loving Conservative MP, whispers conspiratorially.

“I’m actually a passionate defender of our unwritten constitution. I also believe strongly in the role of Parliament, and freedom and transparency in Parliament.”

The MP for Chatham and Aylesford in Kent is a self-confessed tomboy with a hidden geeky side: an idiosyncratic mix that is characterstic of her personality. In Parliament too her work reveals eclectic tastes, ranging from championing women in sports to activism on mental health and alchoholism.

The daughter of a social worker, Crouch is a curious breed of Conservative. “My politics are mixed,” she laughs, “I’m very complex.”

She joined the party under John Major and describes herself as a “compassionate, One Nation Conservative”. Yet she also holds strong views on robust law and order, defends civil liberties, and while she respects Britain's armed forces, calls herself a committed pacifist.

“I think people find it difficult to place me on a spectrum. I’m Conservative through and through – cut me in half and I’m as blue as they come. But I don’t think the Labour party should have exclusive rights to care issues or matters of justice and fairness. They didn’t previously, but we’ve allowed them to.”

Crouch entered Parliament as an MP in 2010. The institution has framed her career so far: she started out as a parliamentary researcher after graduating in law from Hull in the 1990s. In between she spent five years in public affairs at multinational insurance company Aviva.

As Crouch’s political profile has risen, so has her reputation as a rebel. While she does not embrace the label, she vociferously defends her decision to vote in line with her principles, even when at odds with her party.

She voted against the badger cull, in defiance of the government, she says, because “I did something I wish I hadn’t: I read the evidence, which very plainly showed the cull wasn’t going to make any significant difference.” She proceeded to condemn the culls publicly as “barbaric and indiscriminate”.

Crouch grouses that voting against the whips entails being “seen as an evil rebel who’s trying to bring the government down. You need to have people who can think for themselves as well.”

Her other rebellions include voting against press regulation and in support of Mesolthelioma victims, and while she toed the line and voted for David Cameron's swiftly introduced Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act earlier this month, she says it made her feel “very uncomfortable”.

She is also outspoken on the EU. Clarifying her stance, she says: “I’m Eurosceptic, but not anti-European. I’m not a better-off-outer, but I do think we need reform and to make it work better for the UK.”

Crouch recommends that we become “a little more French in our attitude”, arguing that Brits need to embrace a soupçon of Gallic obstinacy. “We should stand up for what we believe in. If we don’t like some things, then we don’t do them.”

While she concedes that “the free travel and the convenience of the European Union” are seductive to voters, she argues that the UK has been damaged by a good deal of financial legislation that has originated in Brussels.

The Tory's bullishness in standing up for her beliefs and principles belies her naturally thoughtful, introspective personality.

A leading proponent of mindfulness, she explains how the Buddhism-derived technique helps her remain calm and composed in the political arena.

She explains: “You just do a meditation, but it’s not an hour on the floor with your legs crossed saying ‘Ommm’; it’s about bringing yourself into the present moment, but also about not beating yourself up.”

Fretful of appearing earnest, she insists she does not ordinarily incline towards new-age and alternative therapies.“I’ve been thrown out of yoga class for laughing. It really wasn’t me... But with this, I went along feeling cynical, and I simply left a complete convert.”

Pausing, she adds: “It was a time in my life where I needed some help to deal with some personal issues and somebody suggested mindfulness.”

Such candidness is common in conversation with Crouch. When I remark on her notable sense of honesty and openness as we chat over a latte in Portcullis House, she laughs: “I’m always told that by interviewers”.

Reflecting on why she is so transparent about her life, she muses: “I’m not a very good liar! I learnt that young and realised there’s no point in trying, because people will suss it. I don’t really want to lie about things, I was brought up not to, and to be honest and true to myself.”

She pauses again, before continuing: “I don’t want to become any less of a person because of this job. I want to look in the mirror and not regret anything I’ve said, or voted on, or shouldn’t have voted on. I think very carefully about any legislation I vote on.”

While mindfulness appeals to Crouch's spiritual side, football is her favourite physical hobby.

She has coached the same girls’ team in Kent for eight years, watching her Under 10 players blossom into young women. She admits she is less fanatical about playing herself these days, but explains that this is partially due to being ineligible for the Westminster side.

“I’m not allowed to play for the parliamentary football team because I’m a girl,” she exclaims, but concedes that since the MPs’ team is run by the Football Association, it has to follow their rules, which stipulate that players over the age of 15 must play in single sex teams.

Her interest in sport pervades her political interests. She is vice chair of the All Party Group for Women in Sport, and also sits on the Culture, Media and Sport select committee, where she admits that sport and media are of greater interest to her than culture.

Last month Crouch embarked on a fundraising mission to climb volcano Cotopaxi in Ecuador with a troop of injured British armed forces veterans. The inauspicious trip was framed by back luck: she was mugged on the first day and then had to give up the climb when her dodgy knees gave way.

She admitted that while “it was an interesting experience, I can’t say I loved it.”

“It was 17 days away, in the company of soldiers and ex-soldiers. They were inspiring, undertaking this challenge with their injuries, but they are used to sleeping on floors in tents and doing their toilet business in a hole. It was physically tough.  It wasn’t like hill walking. It was like mountaineering with crampons and ice picks, helmets and backpacks carrying four litres of water.”

Tough and sporty, Crouch gets fed up with the media portrayal of female politicians and the focus on their appearance and clothes. “I’d love to have a day where every male politician was described as X, age 42, father of three, wearing an M&S tie – I just think it’s an irrelevant fact.”

She is glad to see her female Tory colleagues promoted in the Prime Minister’s latest reshuffle earlier this month, but when asked about being passed over for a ministerial role, she admits with characteristic honesty: “I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t disappointed.”

“I’ve been independent-minded on various issues, or rebellious, as the whips like to call it, and I understand what the consequences of that will be,” she says. "But I’m still a human being and at the end of the day, if people tell you you’re on the verge of promotion and you don’t get promoted, it’s disappointing.”

But while she may have felt put out about failing to gain a junior role in government, her diverse set of skills and wide-ranging interests mean Crouch's ascent is far from over.

Lucy Fisher writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2013. She tweets @LOS_Fisher.


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Calais Jungle: What will happen to child refugees when they leave?

Hundreds of unaccompanied child asylum seekers are being taken to Britain where they face an uncertain future.

Hundreds of unaccompanied child asylum seekers are being taken to Britain, moved from a camp in Calais, northern France, as its closure begins. There were 387 unaccompanied minors in the French refugee camp known as “the Jungle” with links to the UK and they are arriving in England in groups of 70.

Upon arrival, the children are taken to a secure unit for 72 hours, before being reunited with families already living in the UK. They are from a group of more than 1,000 children who have been living in the camp in recent weeks. And now, some of those without links to Britain, but who are regarded as particularly vulnerable, are now also being taken across the English Channel.

The youngsters were granted asylum under the Dublin Regulation. The children’s move to Britain has stalled twice already, over delays in accommodation and establishing proof of age. Migrant children have been subjected to intense media scrutiny upon arrival in recent weeks. Calls for dental checks to verify the true ages of youngsters who looked older were called for, but the UK government branded such a practice as “unethical”.

For a long time, the minors living in the camp faced an uncertain future, but the move to take some children to the UK signals a change of tack by the British and French governments. Britain has been criticised for its lack of humanity, but it now seems that the pleas of these children at least have been heard.

Impact of war

While the youngsters may have escaped serious physical injury, the conflicts in the Middle East will have taken a psychological toll on them. Living in the midst of war, many have witnessed unspeakable horror, losing family members in brutal circumstances. Consequently these youngsters are now incredibly vulnerable to mental illness, with research indicating that more than 80 per cent are likely to develop issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

It is important to remember a child’s trauma extends far beyond the experiences that resulted in them fleeing their homes. The children going to the UK now endured prolonged exposure to stress-inducing conditions in the Calais camp, and will now need to adjust to their new cultural surroundings.

War directly affects millions of children everyday. Exposure to conflict and acts of terrorism can lead to the development of acute or chronic stress reactions. Research also indicates that the psychological impact of war on children is likely to have long-term effects – they don’t simply “grow out” of their stress-related symptoms. Continued exposure to traumatic events, as these children have experienced, carries a cumulative impact too, that can worsen the severity of post-traumatic symptoms.

Funding challenge

The children going to Britain will need the right sort of trauma-based therapeutic support so they can successfully move forward before chronic conditions take hold. However, mental health services in the UK are desperately underfunded. More than 850,000 children and young people have a diagnosable mental health disorder, and half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by the age of 14. But just seven per cent of the total mental health budget is allocated to child and adolescent mental health services, with one in five young people refused treatment because they do not meet the criteria for care.

A recent poll of specialist nurses found 70 per cent thought child and adolescent mental health services in England were inadequate due to historic under-investment. The government is under growing pressure to invest more, and it is hoped that the arrival of these children will see additional money allocated to the services. When, or even if, this will happen, remains unclear.

Post-traumatic growth

While many of these children are likely to suffer form long-lasting psychological symptoms, there is a possibility that some may emerge stronger than they are now, benefiting in some way from the experience resulting in positive post-traumatic growth, or PTG. PTG is possible in children who have been affected by war trauma, particularly if they are young, as they are more open to learning and change. Interestingly, research has revealed that even the negative aspects of PTSD do not “block” growth when children are placed in a supportive environment – found to be the most conducive thing for PTG.

Receiving the proper social support will play an important role in helping these children deal with the psychological effects of war trauma. The complex situation that the young and unaccompanied migrants have faced calls for help that addresses both the trauma and grief, and will secure continuity in their new lives in the UK.

Losing loved ones is just one of many extremely traumatic experiences these children may have faced, and it could prove quite difficult to disentangle the effect of the loss from other stresses and changes. Time does not simply heal the long lasting scars of prolonged stress that they have experienced. However, it is vital that society does not write these children off as ill or broken. With the right support they can lead full lives and make strong contributions in their new homes.

Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.