Traditional terraced properties in Greenwich on June 4, 2014. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Labour’s Help to Build scheme will succeed where the coalition has failed

By providing government guarantees to small construction firms we will kickstart housing supply. 

Today on a visit to a small builder in Kent, we outlined Labour’s proposal to boost small house-builders and help the next generation on to the property ladder. Our Help to Build scheme would underwrite bank loans to smaller housebuilders and unlock much-needed finance to get them building.

We’re in the midst of the biggest housing crisis in a generation. Families and young people are struggling to get on the property ladder. More and more people are living in the private rented sector which often doesn’t provide them the stability and peace of mind that they need. And if you’re on the waiting list for social housing then there are another 1.6 million households in the queue with you. The key driver of the crisis is that we’re simply not building enough homes. We're currently building less than half the number of homes we need to keep up with demand.

It’s true these housing pressures didn’t begin under this government - after all no government has built enough homes for 30 years. But things have certainly got much worse on this government’s watch. Under David Cameron, house building has fallen to its lowest levels in peacetime since the 1920s. Only today, we have learned that the government’s flagship housing policy, the New Homes Bonus, is redistributing money from some of the poorest Labour councils to the richest Tory and Lib Dem authorities, and is not delivering the homes communities need.

Labour can do better. We want more people to realise their dream of home ownership. But, unless we build more homes, property prices will rise further out of reach because supply cannot keep pace with demand. So today we are setting out our proposal to tackle the housing shortage by boosting small-builders by improving their access to finance.

Emerging findings from the Lyons Housing Commission, set up by Ed Miliband to deliver a roadmap to getting 200,000 homes a year built by 2020, show there is a need to increase diversity and competitiveness in the housing sector. Figures show that 25 years ago small builders were building two thirds of new homes. Now they're not even building a third of new homes. Over the same period, the number of firms building between one and 100 units has fallen from over 12,000 to fewer than 3,000.

What has caused this decline? The Federation of Master Builders (FMB) surveys of small house building firms have consistently shown that for these firms access to finance and land are the most significant barriers to growing their businesses and increasing the supply of new homes. In the FMB’s 2013 House Builder Survey, 60 per cent of house builder members cited access to finance as a major barrier to their ability to increase their output of new homes, more than any other factor.

That’s why earlier this year, Labour set out plans to increase access to land for SME builders. The next Labour government will require local authorities to include a higher proportion of small sites in their five year land supply. We will give guaranteed access to public land to smaller firms and custom builders. And we will guarantee that a proportion of the homes built in the next generation of new towns and garden cities will be built by smaller firms.

But we must do more. As Ed Balls said earlier this year, we need a Help to Build scheme that tackles the root cause of the credit crisis for SMEs. Our proposals would kickstart the supply of homes by providing government guarantees for bank lending to SME construction firms in a similar way to how the current Help to Buy scheme underwrites mortgages.

The Help to Buy scheme may increase access to mortgages but, when even Mark Carney, the Governor of the Bank of England, has warned about the risks to our economy of a lopsided housing market where housing demand hugely outstrips supply, it is clear the time is now right for a Help to Build scheme, using the strength of government guarantees to help increase the supply of affordable properties.

Labour’s Help to Build scheme will encourage small house-builders to deliver more homes, as well as stimulating the local economy and helping to prevent prices from spiralling ever further out of reach for young homebuyers. And we would lock in a series of stringent safeguards, such as a cap on the value of loans available for each development, to ensure the scheme is focussed on smaller builders, and the normal bank checks on construction firms' ability to repay.

This proposal alone will not solve the housing crisis. There is no one single proposal that can. That’s why our Housing Commission will report later this year, producing a roadmap of how we can reach our ambition of getting 200,000 homes a year built by 2020. But in the meantime, acting on this crucial issue will help get our small builders building again and it will begin to tackle the housing crisis which is leaving so many people without a decent home at a price they can afford.

Chris Leslie is shadow chief secretary to the Treasury; Emma Reynolds is shadow housing minister.

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This is no time for a coup against a successful Labour leader

Don't blame Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour Party's crisis.

"The people who are sovereign in our party are the members," said John McDonnell this morning. As the coup against Jeremy Corbyn gains pace, the Shadow Chancellor has been talking a lot of sense. "It is time for people to come together to work in the interest of the country," he told Peston on Sunday, while emphasising that people will quickly lose trust in politics altogether if this internal squabbling continues. 

The Tory party is in complete disarray. Just days ago, the first Tory leader in 23 years to win a majority for his party was forced to resign from Government after just over a year in charge. We have some form of caretaker Government. Those who led the Brexit campaign now have no idea what to do. 

It is disappointing that a handful of Labour parliamentarians have decided to join in with the disintegration of British politics.

The Labour Party had the opportunity to keep its head while all about it lost theirs. It could have positioned itself as a credible alternative to a broken Government and a Tory party in chaos. Instead we have been left with a pathetic attempt to overturn the democratic will of the membership. 

But this has been coming for some time. In my opinion it has very little to do with the ramifications of the referendum result. Jeremy Corbyn was asked to do two things throughout the campaign: first, get Labour voters to side with Remain, and second, get young people to do the same.

Nearly seven in ten Labour supporters backed Remain. Young voters supported Remain by a 4:1 margin. This is about much more than an allegedly half-hearted referendum performance.

The Parliamentary Labour Party has failed to come to terms with Jeremy Corbyn’s emphatic victory. In September of last year he was elected with 59.5 per cent of the vote, some 170,000 ahead of his closest rival. It is a fact worth repeating. If another Labour leadership election were to be called I would expect Jeremy Corbyn to win by a similar margin.

In the recent local elections Jeremy managed to increase Labour’s share of the national vote on the 2015 general election. They said he would lose every by-election. He has won them emphatically. Time and time again Jeremy has exceeded expectation while also having to deal with an embittered wing within his own party.

This is no time for a leadership coup. I am dumbfounded by the attempt to remove Jeremy. The only thing that will come out of this attempted coup is another leadership election that Jeremy will win. Those opposed to him will then find themselves back at square one. Such moves only hurt Labour’s electoral chances. Labour could be offering an ambitious plan to the country concerning our current relationship with Europe, if opponents of Jeremy Corbyn hadn't decided to drop a nuke on the party.

This is a crisis Jeremy should take no responsibility for. The "bitterites" will try and they will fail. Corbyn may face a crisis of confidence. But it's the handful of rebel Labour MPs that have forced the party into a crisis of existence.

Liam Young is a commentator for the IndependentNew Statesman, Mirror and others.