George Osborne is interviewed by readers of 'First News', a national newspaper for children and teenagers, on July 2, 2014. Photograph: Getty Images.
Show Hide image

GDP exceeds its peak - but most are still worse off

The economy may be larger than ever, but for most people the recovery hasn't even begun.

Nearly five years after the recession ended, the economy has finally returned to its previous peak. The 0.8 per cent increase in GDP between April and June means that all of the lost output from the crash has now been recovered - and a little bit more (the economy is now 0.2 per cent larger). We've never had it so good, you might say (as Harold Macmillan did in 1957).

Well, not quite. For a start, it's taken the UK more than four years to reach this point: the slowest recovery since the 1870s. By contrast, the US, where the Obama administration avoided many of George Osborne's errors, is now 6.3 per cent larger. And while the economy is bigger than ever, most people aren't any better off. GDP per capita (which takes into account the growth in population since 2008) is still more than 5 per cent below its previous peak. The cake may be slightly bigger, but there are many more mouths to feed. 

The uncomfortable truth is that, for most people, the recovery hasn't even begun. After briefly drawing level with inflation earlier this year, nominal wages increased by just 0.7 per cent in the three months to May (while prices rose by 1.5 per cent), the slowest rate since ONS records began in 2001. So weak has earnings growth been that average wages aren't forecast to return to their pre-recession peak until 2018, while median wages will take even longer to recover. 

Employment is close to a record high, but too many people are stranded in low-wage, low-skill jobs that don't pay them enough to maintain adequate living standards. For them, even as GDP continues to expand, years of depressed pay lie ahead. It is this that means that while the Conservatives boast about the recovery, Labour's "cost-of-living" attack will retain its potency. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Show Hide image

En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.