Ed Miliband. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Ed Miliband says the PM “owes the country an explanation” after Andy Coulson guilty verdict

The Labour leader says the PM’s decision to employ the former News of the World editor “taints David Cameron’s government”.

Ed Miliband has released the following statement in response to the news that former No 10 communications director Andy Coulson has been found guilty of phone hacking:

I think David Cameron has very very serious questions to answer because we now know that he brought a criminal into the heart of Downing Street. David Cameron was warning about Andy Coulson. The evidence mounted up against Andy Coulson. David Cameron must have had his suspicions about Andy Coulson and yet he refused to act.

I believe this isn’t just a serious error of judgment. This taints David Cameron’s government because we now know that he put his relationship with Rupert Murdoch ahead of doing the right thing when it came to Andy Coulson.

I think David Cameron must do much more than an apology – he owes the country an explanation for why he did not act, why he did not act on these allegations against Andy Coulson, why as the evidence piled up he didn’t do anything about it and he’s got to explain.

David Cameron  has already issued a “full and frank apology” for keeping Coulson in No 10 as long as he did. He said: “It was the wrong decision and I’m very clear about that.”

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.