Boris Johnson at the media launch for the Invictus Games 2014 at the Copper Box Arena in the Olympic Park on March 6, 2014 in London. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Would Boris resign as mayor in order to become Conservative leader?

The Tories should start preparing for the possibility of a mayoral by-election next year. 

In defiance of Michael Heseltine's recent advice to him not to stand for parliament until he has completed his second term as Mayor of London in 2016, Boris Johnson is set to announce that he will seek to return as an MP at next year's election. The Daily Mail and the Sun report that he will confirm his intentions by the summer in order to avoid acting as a distraction at the Conservative conference in October (although a distraction he will doubtless remain). 

There is no constitutional bar to Boris becoming an MP and continuing to serve as Mayor. Indeed, there is a precedent. After the first contest in 2000, Ken Livingstone remained the MP for Brent East until 2001. But if, as he has long hinted, Boris intends to run for the Conservative leadership in the event of a Tory defeat in 2015, things become more complicated.

It is inconceivable that he could serve as both Conservative leader and Mayor of London for any significant period of time, leaving him with three options: to avoid standing in 2015, to persuade the party to delay any contest (if Boris stands down a minimum of six months before the end of his term, his deputy takes charge), or to trigger a mayoral by-election. Of these three, despite his pledge to serve a full second term in City Hall, it is the latter that is most likely. But the move would likely do significant damage to his party, which would be accused of disrespecting the mayoralty and would struggle to avoid defeat in the capital. If the polls in 2015 continue to suggest that Boris would outperform any alternative leader, this might be regarded as a price worth paying, but it is one the Tories should start to weigh up now. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.