Steve Webb speaks at the Liberal Democrat autumn conference in Birmingham in 2011. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Steve Webb is a Lib Dem set for bigger things

The reforming pensions minister is in the frame for the post of Lib Dem economic chief.

Here’s a couple of extracts from two newspapers at opposite ends of the political spectrum – the Telegraph and the Guardian - commentating on the Budget.

"The Lib Dem pensions minister, Steve Webb, has now become one of the most important people in government. A rare example of a minister who is an expert in his area, he has been pushing the pension pot liberalisation plan (which is firmly rooted in longstanding Lib Dem party policy) and the legislation on this – which he will almost certainly have to take through the Commons – may be the most important of the next session of parliament."

"One of the outstanding ministerial successes of the Coalition government has been Steve Webb, the pensions minister. Hard-working, competent and trusted by all sides, he bears a great deal of the responsibility for this Budget’s saving revolution".

Would you care to hazard a guess as to which quote comes from which newspaper? It’s hard to tell isn’t it – a rare occurrence, I imagine, when two publications with such different political and economic convictions are commenting on a Budget. But a huge compliment to Steve Webb, who is rightly lauded on both sides of the house as an expert in the field, especially as the architect for the earlier pension reforms in this parliament.

Two weeks ago there was a flurry of speculation about who would get the Lib Dem economic brief for the general election campaign. Will it be Danny, five years as Chief Secretary to the Treasury, or Mystic Vince, the man with the Midas touch on the economy and the canny turn of phrase ("Stalin to Mr. Bean")? 

Now, suddenly, there’s a new name in the frame for that plummiest of jobs in an election campaign. And I can’t help but wonder if it wasn’t just happenstance that Nick Clegg asked Webb to propose the "difficult" debate on the economy at last year's autumn conference – the one where, for a while, it looked like Vince wouldn’t turn up at all. At the time it seemed a slightly leftfield choice – now it suddenly looks like there actually be a bit of a plan.

Steve Webb has been one of the best kept secrets within the Lib Dems for quite a while now, consistently rated by activists as one of our star performers in government, yet largely unknown by the public at large. I suspect that’s all about to change.

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.