Nigel Farage speaks at UKIP's Spring Conference in Torquay earlier today. Photograph: Getty Images.
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UKIP tries to remove journalists from fringe meeting on sharia law

"How can you be both a Muslim and an English man?" asks activist at meeting the party tried to keep reporters out of.

UKIP has long prided itself on its commitment to "free speech" and open debate, but it seems the party isn't prepared to practice what it preaches. There was outrage among journalists at the party's Spring Conference today when officials attempted to remove them from a fringe meeting on sharia law. The Telegraph's Christopher Hope tweeted: "Ukip security has tried to remove the @Telegraph from a fringe meeting on Sharia law. I have refused to move. Outragous." Those journalists who had taken their seats were eventually told that they could stay ("if you behave") but others were reportedly turned away at the door. 

It doesn't require much imagination to guess why UKIP wanted to keep journalists out of the fringe meeting. A session on sharia law could well expose views of the kind that Nigel Farage insists are not tolerated, or even not present, in his party. Indeed, the first question was "How can you be both a Muslim and an English man?" 

Farage declared in his speech today: "We’ve had one or two bad people - we’ve got rid of them." But his officials' anxiousness suggests plenty of rotten apples remain. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.