How the Lib Dems tried to hide the fall in their membership

After membership rose in 2013, the party claims that it has "increased its membership while in power", ignoring the 34% decline since 2010.

The Lib Dems are busy trumpeting the news that their membership has risen in the last year describing themselves as "the first governing party in recent history to have increased its membership while in power". But probe a little and that claim turns out to be as misleading as one of their by-election graphs.

Party membership increased by more than 2,000 in the last quarter of the year, resulting in a net increase of 200 for 2013. The Independent describes this as "an achievement not matched by their Conservative coalition partners who have seen steep falls in paid membership since 2010." But what neither the paper nor the party mentions is that the 200 increase only comes after the Lib Dems suffered the biggest decline of all. As I've previously reported, membership fell from 65,038 in 2010 to 42,501 in 2012, a fall of 35% and the lowest annual figure in the party's 23-year history. An increase of 200 means that the rate of decline is now merely 34%.

One can hardly blame the Lib Dems for leaping on anything resembling good news, but the facts don't tell the story they want.

Update: In a response to me on Twitter, the Lib Dem press office says, "To be clear, we're up 7-800 in total in 2013, inc c2000 in Q4. And yes, 1st governing party to increase members over a year."

That's certainly clearer than the original tweet, which was ambiguous at best. Had I not known the figures, I (and many others) would have assumed membership had increased since 2010.

Nick Clegg speaks at the Liberal Democrat conference in Glasgow earlier this year. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Election results in Wales: Labour on course to remain the largest party

Despite a shock victory for Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood, Welsh Labour will be able to govern without a coalition.

Labour have posted good results in Wales, where the party remains on course to be the controlling force in the Welsh Assembly.

At the time of writing, Carwyn Jones’ party has 24 of the 40 constituency seats, with Plaid Cymru a distant second on 6 and the Conservatives on 5. Among Labour’s notable holds was Gower, which the party lost narrowly at a Westminster level in the 2015 general election by just 27 votes.

There was a surprise victory for Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood in Rhondda, where she defeated Labour cabinet member Leighton Andrews with a swing of 24 per cent. Speaking about the result, a spokesperson for Welsh Labour said:

“The Rhondda result is a really tough for us – we’ve lost a great Minister and one of the most respected politicians in Wales. Clearly the huge national profile afforded to Leanne Wood has had an impact, and Plaid seem to have won this seat at the cost of making progress anywhere else in Wales.

“The other results so far have been good. In particular where we are fighting the Tories it shows the local campaigns have been successful.”

Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Kirsty Williams held on to her seat in Brecon and Radnorshire, while Ukip have yet to win any seats (although they are likely to get a few on the regional list).