Miliband challenges Cameron to stop "ducking and diving" and agree to TV debates

The Labour leader says the debates should be "just like at the last general election", appearing to rule out the participation of Nigel Farage.

Ed Miliband returned to the Labour conference stage this afternoon for a Q&A with party delegates and took the opportunity to make a significant intervention. After declaring, in reference to his pledge to freeze energy prices until 2017, "we know where David Cameron and Nick Clegg stand. They just want to allow energy prices to keep on rising", he added:

We should have that debate over the coming months. We should also have that debate in the TV election debates. It's time for David Cameron to stop ducking and diving and agree to those TV debates, just like at the last general election, so the country can make its choice.

It's thought by many that Miliband intended to make this challenge in his speech but forgot to do so during his note-free 75-minute peformance, although it's also possible he was seeking another newsline.

His suggestion that the debates should be "just like at the last general election" is being interpreted as ruling out the participation of Nigel Farage. If so, that would remove one of the main barriers to cross-party agreement.

David Cameron speaks with Ed Miliband as they stand in Westminster Hall on June 21, 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.