Maria Miller's attack on BBC independence should be resisted

The Culture Secretary's decision to challenge the BBC to take "further action" against tennis commentator John Inverdale is an abuse of power.

Maria Miller's decision to write to the BBC asking what "further action" it plans to take against John Inverdale over his comments about Wimbledon women's champion Marion Bartoli ("never going to be a looker") has won the Culture Secretary rare praise from liberals, but it's not an act they should be applauding. 

No one should defend Inverdale's casual misogyny (and few have) but it is for the corporation, not government ministers, to decide how it disciplines its staff. The principle of BBC independence is too important to be sacrificed on a whim. Inverdale has, as Miller concedes, already apologised "both on-air, and directly in writing to Ms Bartoli" but she still views it as fit to call for his head (without quite summoning the chutzpah to say so).

On his LBC phone-in show this morning, Nick Clegg wisely declined to endorse her criticism and BBC director general Tony Hall has rightly signalled in his response that he regards the matter as closed. Miller's decision to dredge up a two-week-old row likely has more to do with her desire to avoid being shuffled out of the cabinet than any sincere concern for women's rights. It's also not the first time she's taken aim at the principle of a free media. When the Telegraph reported that she claimed £90,000 for a second home where her parents lived, one of Miller's advisers responded in the manner of a Soviet censor by reminding the paper of "the minister's role in implementing the Leveson report". 

In seeking to save her job, Miller has only succeeded in again demonstrating why she is unfit to hold it. 

Culture Secretary leaves Number 10 Downing Street on December 3, 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.