Maria Miller's attack on BBC independence should be resisted

The Culture Secretary's decision to challenge the BBC to take "further action" against tennis commentator John Inverdale is an abuse of power.

Maria Miller's decision to write to the BBC asking what "further action" it plans to take against John Inverdale over his comments about Wimbledon women's champion Marion Bartoli ("never going to be a looker") has won the Culture Secretary rare praise from liberals, but it's not an act they should be applauding. 

No one should defend Inverdale's casual misogyny (and few have) but it is for the corporation, not government ministers, to decide how it disciplines its staff. The principle of BBC independence is too important to be sacrificed on a whim. Inverdale has, as Miller concedes, already apologised "both on-air, and directly in writing to Ms Bartoli" but she still views it as fit to call for his head (without quite summoning the chutzpah to say so).

On his LBC phone-in show this morning, Nick Clegg wisely declined to endorse her criticism and BBC director general Tony Hall has rightly signalled in his response that he regards the matter as closed. Miller's decision to dredge up a two-week-old row likely has more to do with her desire to avoid being shuffled out of the cabinet than any sincere concern for women's rights. It's also not the first time she's taken aim at the principle of a free media. When the Telegraph reported that she claimed £90,000 for a second home where her parents lived, one of Miller's advisers responded in the manner of a Soviet censor by reminding the paper of "the minister's role in implementing the Leveson report". 

In seeking to save her job, Miller has only succeeded in again demonstrating why she is unfit to hold it. 

Culture Secretary leaves Number 10 Downing Street on December 3, 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.