Lobbying scandal spreads to House of Lords

Lord Cunningham, Lord Laird, Lord Mackenzie accepted cash for lobbying.

And now the House of Lords has been dragged into the lobbying scandal. Following an investigation by the Telegraph and Panorama that has just ended Patrick Mercer's career, three members of the House of Lords were filmed offering to lobby ministers for cash. Lord Cunningham, Lord Laird and Lord Mackenzie told undercover reporters from the Sunday Times they would ask parliamentary questions to benefit a ficticious firm, and set up an all-party group as a lobbying vehicle. They also revealed that some peers were hiding conflicts of interest via job-swap deals, pulling strings for each other's clients in parliament. However all three deny any wrongdoing.

“The rules are very complex, but let’s not accuse all members who were involved in all this of being corrupt when in fact they aren’t," Lord Mackenzie told Radio 5live. "They’re simply trying to find their way through the morass of rules – it’s very difficult at times. But I’m quite clear I’ve broken no rules, I’ve asked no questions for money, and I’ve lobbied no ministers and nor would I do.”

He called for a reform of parliamentary rules to make them clearer.

As they stand, the rules for House of Lords members ban them from acting as advocates, hosting functions in the Lords or attempting to influence parliament, and, since 2009, "seeking to profit from membership of the house" in any way, even if they declared a financial interest. During the secretly filmed conversation with reporters, detailed in today's Sunday Times, Mackenzie explained how one could work round them:

“There is a rule that you shouldn’t host a reception in parliament where you have a pecuniary interest,” he said. “I thought that’s bloody nonsense. Nonetheless ... how would you get round that? “I just say to a colleague who has nothing to do with it, would you host a function for me?” He added: “Of course, I do the business anyway, but that gets round it.”

Jack Cunningham with Tony Blair and Bill Clinton. Photograph: Getty Images
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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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