How much does "health tourism" actually cost the NHS?

Jeremy Hunt promises to end the "costly abuse" of the health service by foreigners, but just £12m or 0.01 per cent of the NHS budget was lost in 2011-12.

Based on the attention the government is devoting to the issue, you could be forgiven for believing that "health tourism" is a significant problem. Ahead of his speech on the subject on Wednesday, Jeremy Hunt has vowed to end the "costly abuse" of the NHS by foreigners, declaring that "by looking at the scale of the problem and at where and how improvements can be made we will help ensure the NHS remains sustainable for many years to come". In the speech, Hunt will announce plans to introduce a new tracking system linking a patient's NHS number to their immigration status and GP charges for those not entitled to free care. But how "costly" is this "abuse"?

In 2011-12, the NHS officially spent £33m on treating foreign nationals, £21m of which was recovered. This means that just £12m, or 0.01 per cent of the health service's £109bn annual budget, was lost to "health tourists". In March, when David Cameron raised the issue in his speech on immigration, Hunt claimed the true figure was £200m but produced no evidence to support his claim. But even if we accept the Health Secretary's estimate, this figure accounts for just 0.18 per cent of the NHS budget and that's before we take into account the savings made from British nationals using foreign health services and the administrative cost of the new "crackdown".

As ever when immigration is discussed, it's also important to remember that migrants contribute far more in taxes than they receive in benefits and services. An OECD study earlier this month found that they make a net contribution of 1.02 per cent of GDP or £16.3bn to the UK, largely because they are younger and more economically active than the population in general. As I've noted before, if David Cameron wants to reduce the national debt (and he hasn't had much luck so far), he needs more immigrants, not fewer. While zero net migration would cause the national debt to rise to more than 160 per cent of GDP by 2060-61, an open-door approach would see it fall to around 40 per cent from its current level of 75.2 per cent.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt speaks at the Conservative Party's annual Spring Forum on March 16, 2012 in London. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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