Is Osborne about to abolish the culture department?

Speculation grows that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport could be abolished in the Spending Review, with its functions hived off to other departments.

When George Osborne announced the seven government departments that had agreed "in principle" to cuts of up to 10 per cent in next month's Spending Review, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) was a notable absence. Notable because the department is not one of those ring-fenced from cuts, nor is Culture Secretary Maria Miller one of the cabinet militants (dubbed the "National Union of Ministers") bidding to blunt Osborne's axe. But an answer to this conundrum could be at hand: the DCMS may not exist at all after the review. 

Shadow culture minister Dan Jarvis tweeted last night that "well placed sources in Whitehall" suggested that "#CSR13 may scrap @DCMS - with Culture, Media & Sport going to other Govt depts". When I spoke to Jarvis this morning he told me that while he was "not convinced" that significant savings could be made by scrapping the department, "the government could go down this road to demonstrate that it is 'leading by example' in these tough times and has found way in which 'to do things more efficiently'." 

Rumours that the DCMS could be abolished first began last year, after an Institute of Economic Affairs report suggested that the move would save £1.6bn a year, but it was abandoned after a campaign by Labour and cabinet resistance from the Lib Dems. Now, with Osborne attempting to identify £11.5bn of cuts for 2015-16 (he's currently £9bn short), the option appears to be back on the table. 

As in 2012, Labour has pledged to oppose the move, with Jarvis warning that it would be "driven by short-term expediency, rather than the desire to plan for the long-term". He told me: "Abolishing the department wouldn't be in the long-term interests of sports, or the arts, or the constituent parts of the culture brief. With the importance that they represent to people's daily lives, they deserve that focal point that sits at cabinet." He added: "the DCMS brief, based on its economic contribution alone, well deserves its own department." 

But a DCMS source told me there was "absolutely no truth in these rumours". The source said:

Unsurprisingly, Dan Jarvis doesn’t know what he’s talking about. There is absolutely no truth in these rumours. In Leveson and Equal Marriage, DCMS is responsible for two of the government’s most politically complex policies, alongside delivering one of the government’s largest infrastructure projects - Broadband. The department’s responsibilities continue to expand and its role is more central than ever before.

We'll find out who's right when Osborne's big day arrives in less than a month (26 June). 

Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport Maria Miller. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Harriet Harman warns that the Brexit debate has been dominated by men

The former deputy leader hit out at the marginalisation of women's voices in the EU referendum campaign.

The EU referendum campaign has been dominated by men, Labour’s former deputy leader Harriet Harman warns today. The veteran MP, who was acting Labour leader between May and September last year, said that the absence of female voices in the debate has meant that arguments about the ramifications of Brexit for British women have not been heard.

Harman has written to Sharon White, the Chief of Executive of Ofcom, expressing her “serious concern that the referendum campaign has to date been dominated by men.” She says: “Half the population of this country are women and our membership of the EU is important to women’s lives. Yet men are – as usual – pushing women out.”

Research by Labour has revealed that since the start of this year, just 10 women politicians have appeared on the BBC’s Today programme to discuss the referendum, compared to 48 men. On BBC Breakfast over the same time period, there have been 12 male politicians interviewed on the subject compared to only 2 women. On ITV’s Good Morning Britain, 18 men and 6 women have talked about the referendum.

In her letter, Harman says that the dearth of women “fails to reflect the breadth of voices involved with the campaign and as a consequence, a narrow range [of] issues ends up being discussed, leaving many women feeling shut out of the national debate.”

Harman calls on Ofcom “to do what it can amongst broadcasters to help ensure women are properly represented on broadcast media and that serious issues affecting female voters are given adequate media coverage.” 

She says: "women are being excluded and the debate narrowed.  The broadcasters have to keep a balance between those who want remain and those who want to leave. They should have a balance between men and women." 

A report published by Loughborough University yesterday found that women have been “significantly marginalised” in reporting of the referendum, with just 16 per cent of TV appearances on the subject being by women. Additionally, none of the ten individuals who have received the most press coverage on the topic is a woman.

Harman's intervention comes amidst increasing concerns that many if not all of the new “metro mayors” elected from next year will be men. Despite Greater Manchester having an equal number of male and female Labour MPs, the current candidates for the Labour nomination for the new Manchester mayoralty are all men. Luciana Berger, the Shadow Minister for mental health, is reportedly considering running to be Labour’s candidate for mayor of the Liverpool city region, but will face strong competition from incumbent mayor Joe Anderson and fellow MP Steve Rotheram.

Last week, Harriet Harman tweeted her hope that some of the new mayors would be women.  

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.