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Bercow seeks to reassure after MP's office is searched by police

The Speaker attempts to show that lessons have been learned from the Damian Green affair, telling MPs that he "considered the warrant personally".

New Statesman
House of Commons Speaker John Bercow.

John Bercow has just informed the Commons that an MP's office was searched by police yesterday in relation to a "serious arrestable offence". 

Bercow did not name the MP involved, but Nigel Evans, the deputy speaker and the Conservative MP for Ribble Valley, is currently under investigation by Lancashire police after being arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault earlier this month. Bercow's statement was notable for its attempt to reassure MPs that lessons have been learned from the Damian Green affair in 2008, when police searched the Conservative MP's office despite not having a warrant to do so. 

While reminding the House that "the precincts of Parliament are not a haven from the law", Bercow added that he "considered the warrant personally and was advised by Officers of the House that there were no lawful grounds on which it would be proper to refuse its execution." 

Here's his statement in full:

I wish to report to the House that the rooms of a Member were searched yesterday pursuant to a warrant issued by the Circuit Judge in Preston Crown Court on 16 May. The warrant related to the investigation of a serious arrestable offence.

I should remind Members, as did my predecessor in 2008, that the precincts of Parliament are not a haven from the law. In accordance with the Protocol issued by my predecessor on 8 December 2008 on the execution of search warrants within the precincts of the House of Commons, I considered the warrant personally and was advised by Officers of the House that there were no lawful grounds on which it would be proper to refuse its execution.

In addition, as provided for in paragraph 6 of the Protocol, I consulted the Attorney General and the Solicitor General who concurred in this advice. I am very grateful to them. The Clerk of the House was kept fully informed throughout, and also concurred.

The Serjeant at Arms and Speaker’s Counsel were present when the search was conducted. Undertakings have been given by the police officers as to the handling of any Parliamentary material until such time as any issue of privilege is resolved.

The investigation is continuing and it would not be right to comment further. I will not take questions on my statement.