Miliband makes his first major spending pledge: Labour won't cut the NHS

A Labour government would not consider "cutting the health service", says Miliband in his biggest post-2015 commitment.

Largely unnoticed by the media, Ed Miliband has made his first major spending commitment. Challenged by Nick Robinson on whether a Labour government would consider making cuts to the NHS, Miliband replied:

We're not going to be cutting the health service, I'm very clear about that. We will always be protecting the health service and will always make it a priority.

His decision to rule out cuts to the NHS, even at this early stage, is unsurprising. Polls show that it is the most popular spending area with voters and the above-average rate of inflation in the health service means it frequently requires real-terms rises just to stand still. With David Cameron and George Osborne making it clear that the Tories would continue to ring-fence the NHS after 2015, Labour has no intention of finding itself on the wrong side of this political divide. 

Miliband's pledge means that the Lib Dems are, once again, likely to go into the general election as the only party that would consider making cuts to health. Ahead of the 2015-16 Spending Review in June, Vince Cable has continued to argue that ring-fencing is not "a very sensible" long-term approach.

Ed Miliband said a Labour government would "always be protecting the health service". Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell a minister

The move is revealed in Ed Balls' new book.

Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell, a sports minister. Campbell had served as Tony Blair’s press chief from 1994 to 2003, Ed Balls has revealed.

Although the move fell through, Campbell would have been one of a number of high-profile ministerial appointments, usually through the Lords, made by Brown during his tenure at 10 Downing Street.

Other unusual appointments included the so-called “Goats” appointed in 2007, part of what Brown dubbed “the government of all the talents”, in which Ara Darzi, a respected surgeon, Mark Malloch-Brown, formerly a United Nations diplomat,  Alan West, a former admiral, Paul Myners, a  successful businessman, and Digby Jones, former director-general of the CBI, took ministerial posts and seats in the Lords. While Darzi, West and Myners were seen as successes on Whitehall, Jones quit the government after a year and became a vocal critic of both Brown’s successors as Labour leader, Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn.

The story is revealed in Ed Balls’ new book, Speaking Out, a record of his time as a backroom adviser and later Cabinet and shadow cabinet minister until the loss of his seat in May 2015. It is published 6 September.