Margaret Thatcher's funeral: images of the day

George Osborne sheds a tear and Cherie and Gordon meet again.

Banners are displayed outside Easington Colliery Club and Institute by former miners.

Spectators look on during the funeral.

Gordon Brown greets Cherie Blair.

Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

Guests take their seats during the funeral at St Paul's Cathedral. 

David Cameron after reading from John 14. 1-6

George Osborne weeps during the Bishop of London's sermon. 

William Hague, Justine Thornton, Ed Miliband, Miriam González Durántez, Nick Clegg, Sarah Brown, Gordon Brown, Cherie Blair, Tony Blair, Norma Major, John Major, Samantha Cameron and David Cameron at the funeral.

The Bearer Party made up of personnel from the three branches of the military carry Margaret Thatcher's coffin.

Carol Thatcher, Marco Grass, Sarah Thatcher, Mark Thatcher, Michael Thatcher and Amanda Thatcher look on from the steps of St Paul's Cathedral as the coffin is placed in the hearse.

Margaret Thatcher's coffin is carried on a gun carriage drawn by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery as it arrives at St Paul's Cathedral. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Why a group of Brunel students walked out on Katie Hopkins instead of no-platforming her

"We silently walked out because Ms Hopkins has the right to speak, but we also have the right to express our discontent."

Earlier this week, columnist and all-round provocateur Katie Hopkins turned up to Brunel University to join a panel in debating whether the welfare state has a place in 2015. No prizes for guessing her stance on this particular issue

But as Hopkins began her speech, something odd happened. Around 50 students stood up and left, leaving the hall half-empty.

Here's the video:

As soon as Hopkins begins speaking, some students stand up with their backs to the panelists. Then, they all leave - as the nonplussed chair asks them to "please return to their seats". 

The walk-out was, in fact, pre-planned by the student union as an act of protest against Hopkins' appearance at an event held as part of the University's 50th anniversary celebrations. 

Ali Milani, the Brunel Student Union president, says he and other students knew the walk-out would "start a conversation" around no-platforming on campuses, but as he points out, "What is often overlooked (either purposely or as a result of the fanfare) is that the conversation at no point has been about banning Ms Hopkins from speaking on campus, or denying her right to speak."

Instead, students who found her appearance at the welfare debate "incongruous" and "distasteful" simply left the room: "We silently walked out because Ms Hopkins has the right to speak, but we also have the right to express our discontent."

Milani praised the student body for treading the line between freedom of speech and expressing their distaste at Brunel's decision: 

"They have respectfully voiced their antagonism at the decision of their institution, but also . . . proven their commitment to free of speech and freedom of expression."

The protest was an apt way to dodge the issues of free speech surrounding no-platforming, while rejecting Hopkins' views. A walk-out symbolises the fact that we aren't obliged to listen to people like Hopkins. She is free to speak, of course, albeit to empty chairs. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.