Watch: Lord Ashcroft tries to pwn Owen Jones, fails

Owen Jones announces he's donating Ashcroft-funded prize money to Labour candidate and anti-cuts activists; Tory peer fails to deliver a decent comeback.

Owen Jones caused a bit of a stir last night, when after it was revealed that he had won the Political Book Awards Young Writer of the Year award, he announced he would be giving his £3,000 prize money (donated by Lord Ashcroft) away – half to Lisa Forbes, Labour candidate in Peterborough, and half to the Disabled People Against the Cuts group.

He tweeted:

Thanks to Jones, Tory mega-donor Lord Ashcroft’s money is going to be funding a Labour parliamentary candidate and a group of activists who vehemently oppose the actions of the Conservative politicians in the coalition. When he came up on stage to present another award, Lord Ashcroft attempted to have a pop at Jones in return, and delivered an unconvincing comeback. Watch here (from 1:30):

Transcript of Ashcroft's remarks about Jones:

To Owen Jones, who very kindly said his prize that I was donating he would give to causes – I would like to have a chat with you Owen, because I’m very happy to pay these to charities of your choice for a number of reasons. One, I’ll get tax relief; two, they can get Gift Aid, which will give them a little bit more; and thirdly, you won’t have to pay any tax on the prize. Therefore, if I could invite you to lunch at my local greasy spoon, the House of Lords, to discuss that, I would be delighted.

PS If Owen turns down Lord Ashcroft's offer of a date, it'll only be the second time in 24 hours:

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.