Labour and Lib Dem MPs who voted against gay marriage: full list

Twenty two Labour MPs and four Liberal Democrat MPs voted against the equal marriage bill last night.

While all the attention was on the Conservatives, who voted in greater numbers against equal marriage (136 MPs) than in favour of it (127 MPs), a not insignificant number of Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs also opposed the bill. Twenty two Labour MPs voted against it, with sixteen abstaining, and four Lib Dems voted against it, with seven abstaining. Below is a full list of them. 

Based on the figures, 45 per cent of Tory MPs voted against the bill (58 per cent including abstentions), nine per cent of Labour MPs did (15 per cent including abstentions) and seven per cent of Lib Dem MPs did (20 per cent including abstentions).

Labour MPs who voted against equal marriage (22)

Joe Benton (Bootle)

Ronnie Campbell (Blyth Valley)

Tom Clarke (Coatbridge, Chryston & Bellshill)

Rosie Cooper (Lancashire West)

David Crausby (Bolton North East)

Tony Cunningham (Workington),

Jim Dobbin (Heywood & Middleton)

Brian Donohoe (Ayrshire Central)

Robert Flello (Stoke-on-Trent South)

Mary Glindon (Tyneside North)

Paul Goggins (Wythenshawe & Sale East)

Dai Havard (Merthyr Tydfil & Rhymney)

Michael McCann (East Kilbride, Strathaven & Lesmahagow)

Jim McGovern (Dundee West), Iain McKenzie (Inverclyde)

George Mudie (Leeds East)

Paul Murphy (Torfaen)

Stephen Pound (Ealing North)

Frank Roy (Motherwell & Wishaw)

Jim Sheridan (Paisley & Renfrewshire North)

Derek Twigg (Halton)

Mike Wood (Batley & Spen)

Liberal Democrat MPs who voted against equal marriage (4)

Sir Alan Beith (Berwick-upon-Tweed)

Gordon Birtwistle (Burnley)

John Pugh (Southport)

Sarah Teather (Brent Central)

Labour MPs who did not vote (16)

Dame Anne Begg (Aberdeen South)

Gordon Brown (Kirkcaldy & Cowdenbeath)

Alex Cunningham (Stockton North)

Bill Esterson (Sefton Central)

Pat Glass (Durham North West)

Roger Godsiff (Birmingham Hall Green)

David Heyes (Ashton Under Lyne)

Jim Hood (Lanark & Hamilton East)

Khalid Mahmood (Birmingham Perry Barr)

Michael Meacher (Oldham West & Royton)

Ian Mearns (Gateshead)

Yasmin Qureshi (Bolton South East)

Virendra Sharma (Ealing Southall)

Gavin Shuker (Luton South)

Stephen Timms (East Ham)

Shaun Woodward (St Helens South & Whiston)

Liberal Democrat MPs who did note vote (7)

Norman Baker (Lewes)

Martin Horwood (Cheltenham)

Charles Kennedy (Ross, Skye & Lochaber)

Greg Mulholland (Leeds North West)

John Thurso (Caithness, Sutherland & Easter Ross)

David Ward (Bradford East)

Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central)

Former children's minister Sarah Teather was one of four Liberal Democrat MPs to vote against equal marriage. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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