How Clegg changed his line on Rennard's resignation

After previously suggesting that the Lib Dem chief executive resigned on "health grounds" alone, Clegg admits that concerns over his "inappropriate behaviour" were "in the background".

In his statement on Sunday night, Nick Clegg pointedly noted that Chris Rennard resigned as Liberal Democrat chief executive in 2009 on "health grounds". The implicit suggestion was that Rennard's departure was unrelated to the concerns raised over his behaviour towards female staff. 

But on his phone-in show on LBC radio this morning, the Deputy Prime Minister changed his line. He told presenter Nick Ferrari: "His health was poor and that was the immediate reason he left but of course these things [the concerns over Rennard's behaviour] were in the background." When Channel 4 News's Cathy Newman called into the programme and highlighted this inconsistency, Clegg repeated: "He left on health grounds but of course the issues of his inappropriate behaviour were in the background, of course they were". 

The questions the Deputy PM will need to answer are why he previously sought to give the impression that Rennard's resignation was on health grounds alone and why, if his "inappropriate beaviour" was a factor in his departure, the former chief executive was allowed to return to a senior role in the party as a member of its federal policy committee. 

Update: Here's the moment that "Cathy in Dulwich" called Clegg. 

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg leaves his home on February 27, 2013 in London. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.