What Merkel told Cameron about coalitions

German Chancellor told Cameron before the 2010 general election: "The little party always gets smashed!"

I recently interviewed former Conservative education secretary Kenneth Baker (read his criticisms of Michael Gove here) whose former PA is one David Cameron. While discussing Cameron's political fortunes (Baker said his biggest mistake was failing to secure the boundary changes), he recalled a wonderful (and previously unpublished) anecdote that the Prime Minister once told him.

Shortly before the last general election, Cameron visited Angela Merkel and, with a hung parliament looming, asked her what it was like to lead a coalition. She replied:

"The little party always gets smashed!"

Judging by the recent performance of Merkel's coalition partner, the Free Democrats*, (current poll rating: four per cent, down from 14.6 per cent at the 2009 election) and the Lib Dems (current poll rating: 12 per cent, down from 23 per cent at the election), it looks like the German Chancellor was right. 

*Although the Free Dems exceeded expectations in last weekend's regional election in Lower Saxony

Angela Merkel greets David Cameron upon his arrival at the Chancellery on June 7, 2012 in Berlin. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.