Ed Miliband: Labour made mistakes in tackling the "realities of segregation"

The Labour leader will tackle immigration, assimilation and his party’s legacy in government in a speech later today.

Ed Miliband will admit that the Labour government made mistakes on immigration and the “realities of segregation” in a speech in south London later today.

“Too little” was done to help people settle in Britain integrate into society, he will say, while also stressing how proud he is of "multi-ethnic, diverse Britain".

The speech will contain proposals for how a new Labour government would tackle these issues. At the centre of his plan is language – every citizen should know how to speak English, and staff in publicly-funded jobs who interact with the public should be able to demonstrate proficiency in the language.

The Guardian’s Nicholas Watt reports that the Labour leader will propose that English language teaching for newcomers be prioritised over funding for “non-essential written translation materials” and that “statements on English language learning within Home School Agreements” to share responsibility for children’s language learning between parents and schools.

Miliband will also emphasise that this set of proposals is part of the “One Nation” framework he set out in his party conference speech earlier this year and not a “dog whistle” attempt to prevent Labour defections to the BNP. He will say:

"We can only converse if we can speak the same language. So if we are going to build One Nation, we need to start with everyone in Britain knowing how to speak English. We should expect that of people that come here. We will work together as a nation far more effectively when we can always talk together."

 

The Labour leader will say how proud he is of "multi-ethnic, diverse Britain". Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

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David Cameron calls Sadiq Khan a “proud Muslim” – after trying to link him to Islamic extremism

The PM has his best flipflops on.

After months of backing the nasty racial politics of the Tory mayoral campaign, the Prime Minister has taken the bold move of sharing a platform with infamous moderate Sadiq Khan on the EU Remain campaign trail. Quite a spectacular about-turn.

Compare and contrast, readers.

David Cameron, 20 April 2016

“If we are going to condemn not just violent extremism, but also the extremism that seeks to justify violence in any way, it is very important that we do not back these people, and we do not appear on platforms with them. And I have to say, I am concerned about Labour’s candidate for Mayor of London, who has appeared again and again and again . . . The Honourable Member for Tooting has appeared on a platform with him [imam Suliman Gani] nine times. This man supports IS.”

David Cameron, 30 May 2016

“Let me first of all congratulate Sadiq on his victory. He talked about his father. He’s the son of a bus driver. I’m the son of a stockbroker, which is not quite so romantic. But he makes an important point about our country. In one generation someone who’s a proud Muslim, a proud Brit and a proud Londoner can become mayor of the greatest city on Earth. That says something about our country. There are still glass ceilings we have got to smash. There’s still discrimination we have got to fight.”

What a difference a month makes, eh?

I'm a mole, innit.