Ed Miliband: Labour made mistakes in tackling the "realities of segregation"

The Labour leader will tackle immigration, assimilation and his party’s legacy in government in a speech later today.

Ed Miliband will admit that the Labour government made mistakes on immigration and the “realities of segregation” in a speech in south London later today.

“Too little” was done to help people settle in Britain integrate into society, he will say, while also stressing how proud he is of "multi-ethnic, diverse Britain".

The speech will contain proposals for how a new Labour government would tackle these issues. At the centre of his plan is language – every citizen should know how to speak English, and staff in publicly-funded jobs who interact with the public should be able to demonstrate proficiency in the language.

The Guardian’s Nicholas Watt reports that the Labour leader will propose that English language teaching for newcomers be prioritised over funding for “non-essential written translation materials” and that “statements on English language learning within Home School Agreements” to share responsibility for children’s language learning between parents and schools.

Miliband will also emphasise that this set of proposals is part of the “One Nation” framework he set out in his party conference speech earlier this year and not a “dog whistle” attempt to prevent Labour defections to the BNP. He will say:

"We can only converse if we can speak the same language. So if we are going to build One Nation, we need to start with everyone in Britain knowing how to speak English. We should expect that of people that come here. We will work together as a nation far more effectively when we can always talk together."

 

The Labour leader will say how proud he is of "multi-ethnic, diverse Britain". Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Supreme Court Article 50 winner demands white paper on Brexit

The Supreme Court ruled Parliament must be consulted before triggering Article 50. Grahame Pigney, of the People's Challenge, plans to build on the victory. 

A crowd-funded campaign that has forced the government to consult Parliament on Article 50 is now calling for a white paper on Brexit.

The People's Challenge worked alongside Gina Miller and other interested parties to force the government to back down over its plan to trigger Article 50 without prior parliamentary approval. 

On Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court ruled 8-3 that the government must first be authorised by an act of Parliament.

Grahame Pigney, the founder of the campaign, said: "It is absolutely great we have now got Parliament back in control, rather than decisions taken in some secret room in Whitehall.

"If this had been overturned it would have taken us back to 1687, before the Bill of Rights."

Pigney, whose campaign has raised more than £100,000, is now plannign a second campaign. He said: "The first step should be for a white paper to be brought before Parliament for debate." The demand has also been made by the Exiting the European Union select committee

The "Second People's Challenge" aims to pool legal knowledge with like-minded campaigners and protect MPs "against bullying and populist rhetoric". 

The white paper should state "what the Brexit objectives are, how (factually) they would benefit the UK, and what must happen if they are not achieved". 

The campaign will also aim to fund a Europe-facing charm offensive, with "a major effort" to ensure politicians in EU countries understand that public opinion is "not universally in favour of ‘Brexit at any price’".

Pigney, like Miller, has always maintained that he is motivated by the principle of parliamentary sovereignty, rather than a bid to stop Brexit per se.

In an interview with The Staggers, he said: "One of the things that has characterised this government is they want to keep everything secret.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.