"It's got to do with Iran" - Chief Rabbi caught off guard on the Today programme

Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks says Gaza conflict is "to do with Iran" after not realising he was still on air.

There was an amusing moment on the Today programme this morning when, after delivering Thought For The Day, Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks was asked by presenter Evan Davis for his thoughts on the situation in Gaza. Not appearing to realise he was still on air, he sighed and replied, "I think it's got to do with Iran, actually", a moment of candour that prompted co-presenter Sarah Montague to whisper, "we, we're live!"

Sacks then delivered a more banal response offering a "a continued prayer for peace, not only in Gaza but for the whole region. No one gains from violence, not the Palestinians, not the Israelis. This is an issue here where we must all pray for peace and work for it."

One wonders: did Sacks not finish his point because he thought it was inappropriate or because he thought Today thought it was inappropriate?

You can listen to the exchange in full above.

Update: The BBC has apologised for catching Sacks off-guard. A spokesman said: "The Chief Rabbi hadn’t realised he was still on-air and as soon as this became apparent, we interjected. Evan likes to be spontaneous with guests but he accepts that in this case it was inappropriate and he has apologised to Lord Sacks. The BBC would reiterate that apology."

Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.