Cameron warns child abuse scandal could become a "witch-hunt" against gay people

How the PM responded to being shown a list of three Tories accused of involvement.

David Cameron was visibly unsettled when Phillip Schofield handed him a list of three Conservatives accused of involvement in the child abuse scandal during his appearance on This Morning, and he may come to regret his response. "There is a danger that this could turn into a sort of witch-hunt, particularly against people who are gay," Cameron said.

By suggesting that some on the list "are gay", the Prime Minister has inadvertently encouraged further speculation over their identity. But it is with Schofield, who showed gross irresponsibility by asking Cameron to comment on a list based on internet rumour, that the blame must rest. After warning against a "witch-hunt", Cameron added: "I'm worried about the sort of thing you're doing right now, giving me a list of names that you've taken off the internet".

Earlier this week, Labour MP Susan Elan Jones asked the government to assure her that any member of the House of Lords found guilty of child abuse would be "stripped of their peerage" in what many saw as a deliberate attempt to hint at the identity of one of the alleged abusers. Theresa May has warned MPs that using parliamentary privilege to name those accused of involvement could jeopardise any future trial.

David Cameron made his remarks during an appearance on ITV show This Morning. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.