Hollywood comes out to bat for Obama: video round-up

Sarah Jessica Parker, Lena Dunham, and Lucas Gray have all produced videos in support of the president.

Under two weeks to go until the US election, and the media world is going headfirst into its support of both candidates. But mainly Obama.

Sarah Jessica Parker appeared on Access Hollywood and passionately gave her reasons for supporting Obama (after a detour about her trip to collect Irish groceries which, apparently, are a thing) – and for opposing Romney.

Jezebel, who posted the video, sum up her appearance:

Romney's flip-flopping, almost accidentally shows her home address on National TV because she's JUST LIKE US, acknowledges that she would be better off financially with Romney as president but she's concerned about equality and women's rights, she won't move to Canada if Romney wins because she will not give up on this country, she is all about women voting, WOMEN VOTE DAMMIT OR SHE WILL COME AFTER YOU. . .

SJP for president! OF MY HEART.

Elsewhere, animator Lucas Gray, who has previously worked on the Simpsons and Family Guy, wrote and directed a superb three-minute adaptation of one of Obama's speeches into a film called Why Obama Now. It focuses on attacking the concept of "trickle down" economics, and does a remarkably good job. Plus, it has graphs, but doesn't scare people with them:

Finally, Lena Dunham, writer, director and star of Sky's Girls, has produced a sweetly funny video about her first time (voting), aimed at people in the same situation this year as she was last election:

The president speaks. Image from the video "Why Obama Now"

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.