New Statesman Ai Weiwei guest edit shortlisted at the British Media Awards

Nominated for Cross-Media Project Of The Year.

An issue of the New Statesman has been nominated for Cross-Media Project Of The Year at the British Media Awards.

The 22 October issue, guest-edited by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, is up for the award. The issue was themed around China and its future, and was published simultaneously in Chinese (digitally) and in English. Unusually, we urged people to share and download the magazine for free so as to spread Ai's words as widely as possible.

Ai Weiwei is an internationally renowned artist and a free speech advocate. He was detained by the government for 81 days last year on charges of tax evasion, is still prevented from leaving the country and is currently appealing a fine imposed by the Beijing Local Taxation Bureau for $1.85m.

The issue featured, among other things, an interview with blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, a conversation with one of China's "paid trolls", a photo essay curated by Ai himself and a leader in which the Chinese artist addressed the lack of freedom and the oppression in his country.

The New Statesman is nominated alongside The Times, Metro, Racing Post, PwC, Paperhat, Nature and Rivergroup.

Cover portrait by Gao Yuan for Ai Weiwei Studio.

 

Ai Weiwei guestedited the New Statesman on 22 October 2012.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Martin Sorrell: I support a second EU referendum

If the economy is not in great shape after two years, public opinion on Brexit could yet shift, says the WPP head.

On Labour’s weakness, if you take the market economy analogy, if you don’t have vigorous competitors you have a monopoly. That’s not good for prices and certainly not for competition. It breeds inefficiency, apathy, complacency, even arrogance. That applies to politics too.

A new party? Maybe, but Tom Friedman has a view that parties have outlived their purpose and with the changes that have taken place through globalisation, and will do through automation, what’s necessary is for parties not to realign but for new organisations and new structures to be developed.

Britain leaving the EU with no deal is a strong possibility. A lot of observers believe that will be the case, that it’s too complex a thing to work out within two years. To extend it beyond two years you need 27 states to approve.

The other thing one has to bear in mind is what’s going to happen to the EU over the next two years. There’s the French event to come, the German event and the possibility of an Italian event: an election or a referendum. If Le Pen was to win or if Merkel couldn’t form a government or if the Renzi and Berlusconi coalition lost out to Cinque Stelle, it might be a very different story. I think the EU could absorb a Portuguese exit or a Greek exit, or maybe even both of them exiting, I don’t think either the euro or the EU could withstand an Italian exit, which if Cinque Stelle was in control you might well see.

Whatever you think the long-term result would be, and I think the UK would grow faster inside than outside, even if Britain were to be faster outside, to get to that point is going to take a long time. The odds are there will be a period of disruption over the next two years and beyond. If we have a hard exit, which I think is the most likely outcome, it could be quite unpleasant in the short to medium term.

Personally, I do support a second referendum. Richard Branson says so, Tony Blair says so. I think the odds are diminishing all the time and with the triggering of Article 50 it will take another lurch down. But if things don’t get well over the two years, if the economy is not in great shape, maybe there will be a Brexit check at the end.

Martin Sorrell is the chairman and chief executive of WPP.

As told to George Eaton.

This article first appeared in the 30 March 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Wanted: an opposition