New Statesman Ai Weiwei guest edit shortlisted at the British Media Awards

Nominated for Cross-Media Project Of The Year.

An issue of the New Statesman has been nominated for Cross-Media Project Of The Year at the British Media Awards.

The 22 October issue, guest-edited by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, is up for the award. The issue was themed around China and its future, and was published simultaneously in Chinese (digitally) and in English. Unusually, we urged people to share and download the magazine for free so as to spread Ai's words as widely as possible.

Ai Weiwei is an internationally renowned artist and a free speech advocate. He was detained by the government for 81 days last year on charges of tax evasion, is still prevented from leaving the country and is currently appealing a fine imposed by the Beijing Local Taxation Bureau for $1.85m.

The issue featured, among other things, an interview with blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, a conversation with one of China's "paid trolls", a photo essay curated by Ai himself and a leader in which the Chinese artist addressed the lack of freedom and the oppression in his country.

The New Statesman is nominated alongside The Times, Metro, Racing Post, PwC, Paperhat, Nature and Rivergroup.

Cover portrait by Gao Yuan for Ai Weiwei Studio.

 

Ai Weiwei guestedited the New Statesman on 22 October 2012.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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FTSE 100 plunges after Theresa May signals hard Brexit ahead

The Prime Minister is to lay out her Brexit plan later today. 

The FTSE 100 and the FTSE 250 plummeted this morning after the Prime Minister signalled Brexit will mean leaving the single market.

Theresa May is expected to rule out "partial membership" or any other kind of "half-in, half-out" deal with the EU in a speech later today.

The FTSE 100, the index of the UK's 100 biggest companies, and the FTSE 250 both fell more than 0.3 per cent immediately after opening. 

The worst performers included the housebuilder Barratt Developments, consumer goods tester Intertek and the mining company BHP.

Stock markets have been buoyant since Brexit, in part because many of Britain's biggest companies are international and benefit from a devalued pound. 

However, while markets fell, the pound crept up against the dollar, to $1.21. 

Critics of the Prime Minister say she is sacrificing the economy to prioritise immigration controls.

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady warned: "If we leave the single market, working people will end up paying the price. It'd be bad for jobs, for work rights & for our living standards."

According to the Office for National Statistics, inflation rose from 1.2 per cent in November to 1.6 per cent in December. 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.